Samsung and Sony - searching for a new frontier

 

Sony chief executive Kazuo Hirai speaks to the BBC's Rory Cellan-Jones.

Do you get excited by yet another new touchscreen smartphone? Does the latest all-singing all-dancing tablet grab your attention?

Unless you are a dedicated technophile, I imagine the answer is no. And that is why the major technology firms are now on the hunt for new kinds of gadget to whet the jaded appetites of consumers.

As Berlin's IFA consumer electronics show gets under way, we have already seen two firms, Samsung and Sony, trying to stake out new territory with products that look different.

By unveiling the Samsung Gear smartwatch in a vast arena with an orchestra and a live link to New York's Times Square, the Korean firm was not going for a low-key debut for its new product category.

There are some cool things about the watch - raise it to your ear and it knows you want to make a call, swipe across its face and it is ready to take a photo from the camera in the strap. A clutch of well-known apps are already on board, and leading developers are preparing more.

Rory Cellan Jones scrutinises the Samsung Gear

But after the initial "Ooh"s and "Aah"s from the audience, serious doubts quickly emerged. The Gear is not a stand-alone device, but a smartphone accessory - and one that right now works with only one phone, Samsung's Galaxy Note. So, an expensive toy, and one that will need charging every day.

Beyond a minority of tech enthusiasts, it is hard to see a huge market for this product, especially when other smartwatches which work with a whole range of phones are already out there. But Samsung will be happy to have beaten Apple to the punch - its iWatch may end up defining this new market, but at the moment it is no more than a rumour.

Sony, with a somewhat less lavish press event, still wanted to give the world something new. Its offering - stand-alone lenses that connect to a smartphone via wifi - seeks to redefine the mobile photography experience. The idea is that they add some of the quality of a digital SLR camera to the convenience of smartphone photography.

Sony Lens - a portable lens which attaches to a smartphone Sony's offering: a stand-alone lens which connects to a smartphone

Sony's engineering prowess is in no doubt, and the demo in Berlin looked very impressive. But how many people are going to want to carry another quite bulky product with them along with their smartphone? This looks like another product hunting down an audience that just might not be there.

Under its new leader, Kazuo Hirai, Sony seems to have got some of its mojo back, but it is still searching for the new Walkman - a product that will redefine what we expect from technology.

Sony and Samsung also launched impressive new phones - the Xperia Z1 and the latest version of the Phablet, the Galaxy Note 3. But, with profit margins from smartphones now being squeezed, the tech giants are restlessly scanning the horizon for the next big thing. So far, it has yet to emerge in Berlin, but I will let you know if I spot it.

 
Rory Cellan-Jones, Technology correspondent Article written by Rory Cellan-Jones Rory Cellan-Jones Technology correspondent

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  • rate this
    0

    Comment number 76.

    Biggest fear- buying into these new apps & toys, you might as well paint a target on your back saying: Here I am & here is everything you would ever want to know about me!
    What is wrong with the "techie tribe" that they do not fear such headlines as: "US and UK intelligence agencies reportedly crack technology used to encrypt internet services such as online banking, medical records and email."

  • rate this
    0

    Comment number 75.

    How about household robotics? It's something that has only been in scifi novels since the 40's.... We want them! You just need to figure out how to make them cheaply, now.

  • rate this
    +3

    Comment number 74.

    BINGO!

    I just watched the video and got a buzzword bingo full house.

    When Kazuo Hirai said "going forward" for the third time I hit the pause button and gave up. Lots of words but no content. I wonder if that's what it takes to become a company CEO.

    I'm at a standstill right now. I'll be going forward later.

  • rate this
    0

    Comment number 73.

    In your search for 'the next big thing' I don't think you should be looking at the screen, but inside the devices. We need a step change in battery technology to enable the next level of functionality in mobile devices. Until then I suspect we're pretty much at the limit of their capability.

  • rate this
    +2

    Comment number 72.

    I choked really badly on an apple about 7 years ago. Never touched them since.

 

Comments 5 of 76

 

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