Samsung retries botched update to Galaxy S3 smartphone

models hold a Samsung Galaxy S and a Galaxy S3 Mini (R) smartphones The Galaxy S3 was Samsung's flagship smartphone but has been succeeded by the S4

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Samsung has started again to roll out an update to its Galaxy S3 smartphone, weeks after a botched attempt angered users.

Some S3 owners were left with devices that drained battery quickly, would suddenly freeze, or were "bricked" altogether.

The update was to give users version 4.3 of the Android operating system - also known as Jelly Bean.

"We are sorry for the inconvenience this has caused," the company said.

A statement explained: "The fix for the issues with Galaxy S3 Jelly Bean 4.3 upgrade has begun rolling out to selected users in the UK, and will continue to do so.

"Specific upgrade schedules will vary by mobile operators. Please check your phone for the upgrade."

Samsung was unable to give more precise details on who the "selected" users were, or when the problem would be fully resolved for all.

'How much longer?'

Users in the UK and US appeared to be worst affected by the problems, which began last month.

Samsung was forced to temporarily suspend its upgrade service after a flood of complaints on social media - with the length of time it has taken to fix being the most common complaint.

"We have paid a lot of money for this phone," wrote Tushar Dass on Facebook. "I don't think we deserve this treatment."

Another added: "How much longer must we wait for a working phone, Samsung? Been over two weeks now. I'm paying £27 a month for a phone that's about as useful as a chocolate teapot."

Enthusiasts and bloggers speculated that the update may have been rushed out to ensure compatibility with the recently released Galaxy Gear smartwatch.

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