Bafta games: The Last of Us clears up at awards

Naughty Dog team speak of their pride at the Bafta success of The Last of Us'

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Zombie thriller The Last of Us was the big winner at the video game Baftas, taking home the top prize of best game.

It was one of five awards won by the game, including a best performance prize for voice-actor Ashley Johnson.

UK-made PlayStation Vita title, Tearaway, also enjoyed a successful night, taking home three awards, including best mobile game.

Rockstar, the maker of Grand Theft Auto 5, was honoured with the Bafta Fellowship Award.

Rockstar, which won its first Bafta in 1995, drew a standing ovation upon receiving the accolade.

In his acceptance speech co-founder, Dan Houser, said: "This is a tremendous honour to us as a mostly British-run company.

Tearaway PlayStation Vita title Tearaway was the crowd's favourite at the event

"This is the first time, as far as I know, that Bafta has given an award to 900 people.

"Rockstar is a team and a family and it has always been our policy to focus on collaboration. Games are made by hundreds of amazingly talented people, sometimes happily, sometimes with screaming arguments, but always with a passion for the project."

'Super exciting'

The broadest smiles of the night belonged to the team from California-based Naughty Dog.

Their game, The Last of Us, released on PlayStation 3 last summer, was the biggest winner of the night.

"The team worked insanely hard for three-and-a-half years, and put a lot of faith in us, so coming out the other side and bringing all these awards home to them is super exciting," the developers said, speaking to the BBC's Dan Emery at the London event.

The Last of Us art The Last of Us is a tense, zombie-filled thriller on PlayStation 3

Games journalist Rob Crossley, from CVG, told the BBC that while many may have expected Grand Theft Auto 5 to have picked up more awards, it was The Last of Us was a more than worthy winner.

"Grand Theft Auto is an achievement in everything that video games have been over the last 20 years," he said. "It's expansive, emergent gameplay of astounding scale."

"But The Last of Us probably represents where we're going to go with games in the next 10 years."

'New art-form'

Far smaller in scale than its older brother, the Bafta film awards, the video game Baftas are without the same level of pomp.

But the event is growing in popularity, and some see gaming's emergence as a major entertainment form to rival music, film and television.

"It's extraordinarily rare to be around when a new art-form is being born," said Steven Moffat, writer of Doctor Who and Sherlock, as he presented The Last of Us with the award for best story.

"[Video games] are going to own the future. I am here chiefly to crawl to my new bosses."

Full list of winners

Category

Winner

Best action and adventure

The Last of Us (Naughty Dog)

Debut game

Gone Home (The Fallbright Company)

British game

Grand Theft Auto 5 (Rockstar)

Best music

Bioshock Infinite (Irrational Games)

Best story

The Last of Us (Naughty Dog)

Strategy and simulation

Papers, Please (Lucas Pope)

Artistic achievement

Tearaway (Media Molecule)

Audio achievement

The Last of Us (Naughty Dog)

Sport

Fifa 14 (EA Sports)

Family

Tearaway (Media Molecule)

Game innovation

Brothers: A tale of Two Sons (Starbreeze Studios)

Mobile and handheld

Tearaway (Media Molecule)

One to watch

Size DOES Matter (Team DOS)

Game design

Grand Theft Auto 5 (Rockstar)

Multiplayer

Grand Theft Auto 5 (Rockstar)

Best performer

Ashley Johnson as Ellie in The Last of Us (Naughty Dog)

Best game

The Last of Us (Naughty Dog)

Bafta Fellowship

Rockstar Games

Follow Dave Lee on Twitter @DaveLeeBBC

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