Fuji Xerox printer 'comes to your desk' with documents

'Robot Printer' Autonomously Moves Around Lounge When the robot printer receives a print job, it will begin to move towards the person who ordered the printout

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Fuji Xerox has developed a new robotic printer that can move around a lounge or office to bring documents to the person who printed them.

The printer is designed to be used primarily in public places as a way to keep sensitive documents secure.

Sensors on the machine prevent it from bumping into people on the way.

However, some analysts argued that the idea was not cost effective when compared with other secure printing methods.

Describing use of the printer in, for example, an airport business lounge, IDC analyst Maggie Tan told the BBC there are better methods already available.

"The majority of these business lounges would have higher printing demand, especially from business travellers who always need to print urgently using a secured method.

"There are several mobile printing solutions available today that users can submit the print job online through their mobile devices or laptops and they are given a secured password to collect their printouts."

Start Quote

One might even argue that it seems more like technology for technology's sake”

End Quote Bryan Ma Analyst, IDC
Tokyo test

Bryan Ma, also from IDC, complimented the ingenuity, if not the practicality of the device.

"Sounds like something very unique to Japan.

"One might even argue that it seems more like technology for technology's sake."

Fuji Xerox - a joint venture between the two firms - has been testing the printer this month at a business lounge in Tokyo.

Each desk in the lounge is given a unique web address from which to print. Users access the address and upload documents to be printed.

Once the printer receives the job, it moves to the intended recipient who then has to display a smart card to activate printing.

The battery in the printer lasts for up to a day.

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