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Newspaper review: Milibands still dominate headlines

Papers

The Miliband brothers are once again dominating the headlines, as the newspapers ponder Ed's first speech as leader and David's political future.

Ed Miliband's address to the Labour conference will be a damning rebuke of his predecessors, Tony Blair and Gordon Brown, says the Independent.

The Daily Mail thinks Mr Miliband's most pressing task is to demonstrate he is more than a union puppet.

The Daily Telegraph says he must declare where he stands on the deficit.

'Dignity in defeat'

According to the Times, private polling for the Conservatives suggests David Miliband would have been more popular with voters.

The Daily Mail thinks the older Miliband is on the brink of walking away from front-line politics.

The Times tells him to go, comparing the brothers' rivalry and relationship to the Blair-Brown split.

"David Miliband's dignity in defeat", says the Daily Mirror, is a reminder to Labour of what it missed.

International sanctions

The Daily Express leads with comments by the deputy governor of the Bank of England, Charles Bean.

"We must spend to save Britain" is how the Express paraphrases it.

The Guardian reports Shell bought nearly £1bn worth of crude from Iran's state-owned oil company during the summer, as tougher international sanctions were being imposed on Tehran because of its nuclear programme.

The papers says Shell is not accused of acting illegally but it thinks the company's actions will expose it to growing political pressure.

Metric message

Emma Thompson makes the Daily Telegraph's front page for criticising teenagers' sloppy use of English.

The actress apparently told girls at her old school that saying "innit" and "like" made them sound stupid.

The Sun has noticed that Cadbury has dropped its famous "glass and a half" slogan from Dairy Milk wrappers.

Instead, they now carry the metric message: "The equivalent of 426 millilitres of fresh liquid milk in every 227 grammes of milk chocolate."

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