7 July London bombings

CLICKABLE Find out more about the victims and survivors of the Edgware Road bomb attack

Laura Webb Jonathan Downey Colin William Morley Jennifer Vanda Nicholson Michael Stanley Brewster David Graham Foulkes Laura Webb Jonathan Downey Colin William Morley Jennifer Vanda Nicholson Micheal Stanley Brewster David Graham Foulkes Catherine Al-Wafai John Tulloch Daniel Biddle David Gardner Catherine Al-Wafai John Tulloch David Gardner Daniel Biddle

Source: 7 July inquests - all positions are approximate and based on witness statements

Wreckage and debris left by the explosion

The device was activated close to a set of double doors

Laura Webb

Age: 29

Laura Webb

Ms Webb was from Islington in north London and worked as a personal assistant with DDB Europe, an advertising company, based in Paddington. Witness statements indicate that she survived for a short period after the explosion, despite being the second closest to the bomber. A number of passengers tried in vain to save her and to maintain her circulation, with the help of other commuters who shouted instructions.
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Jonathan Downey

Age: 34

Jonathan Downey

Mr Downey, who grew up in Northamptonshire, lived in Milton Keynes and worked in human resources for the Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea, one of the capital's main councils. He and his wife had taken the same train to Euston before going their separate ways. Evidence suggests that he was killed instantly. Of those who died, Mr Downey is thought to have been standing closest to the bomber.
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Colin William Morley

Age: 52

Colin William Morley

Mr Morley was a married father of three. He was a marketing consultant who used his skills to help charities to use the strength of their brands for social good. He was found lying near to the body of David Foulkes and the evidence suggests that he was killed in the immediate explosion. Mr Morley's wife later wrote that her husband was so dedicated to helping others that he left "a most magical beautiful light" wherever he went.
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Jennifer Vanda Nicholson

Age: 24

Jennifer Vanda Nicholson

Miss Nicholson was standing by the carriage doors when the bomb detonated and was blown out of the train onto the track. The talented musician, who commuted daily from Reading, was working for a specialist music publisher when she was killed. Miss Nicholson did not usually take the train she boarded that day. Problems on her usual line led her to take the Circle Line instead. The evidence suggests she was killed instantly.
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Michael Stanley Brewster

Age: 52

Michael Stanley Brewster

Michael Brewster, known as Stan, was married with two children. The senior project engineer for Derbyshire County Council had been in London for a conference. Fellow passengers made considerable efforts to try to save him at the scene, but he succumbed to his injuries. Mr Brewster's family spent a week searching London for him, until police were able to confirm he was one of the victims.
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David Graham Foulkes

Age: 22

David Graham Foulkes

Mr Foulkes, from Oldham, was a media sales manager for the Guardian newspaper based in Manchester, where he lived with his parents and sister. He was making plans to move in with his girlfriend, Stephanie Reid, and she and his family said he was enjoying life and his career at the time of the blast. Mr Foulkes was in London for a meeting with a colleague. The evidence indicates he was killed instantly.
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David Gardner

Age: 55

David Gardner

David Gardner, a management accountant at the Evening Standard, lost his left leg and spleen in the attacks. He was blown off his seat and onto the carriage floor, where he drifted in and out of consciousness while fellow passenger Jason Rennie, an ex-Army officer, made a tourniquet for his badly-damaged left leg. Mr Gardner had been due to direct a performance of Shakespeare's Julius Caesar and was reading the script when the bomb exploded.
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Daniel Biddle

Age: 31

Daniel Biddle

Daniel Biddle, running late for work, was standing close to plot ringleader Mohammad Sidique Khan when the bomb exploded. He described seeing Khan's arm move quickly and then a "big, white flash". The construction manager was blown from the carriage and lost both legs, his left eye and his spleen. He was helped by a fellow passenger who made tourniquets from his belt and shirt. A 20p piece remains lodged in Mr Biddle's thigh bone, and other shrapnel, including his door keys, was removed by surgeons.
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John Tulloch

Age: Unknown

John Tulloch

Professor John Tulloch was sitting on the opposite side of the carriage from Mohammed Sidique Khan. Mr Tulloch had returned from Australia a few days before the bombing and had yet to go home to Cardiff, so was carrying three bags with him. A hard suitcase by his feet saved him from serious injury. Prof Tulloch's left ear drum was perforated and shrapnel from the blast is still embedded in his head.
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Catherine Al-Wafai

Age: Unknown

Catherine Al-Wafai

Ms Al-Wafai, who suffered small injuries to her arm and thigh, was on her way to a job interview when the blast happened, severely injuring a woman to her left. Covered in blood, Ms Al-Wafai walked away unaided from the scene. Emerging from the Tube, she found staff from a nearby Marks and Spencer store helping survivors. She only realised she had lost a shoe when she arrived home. "I collapsed in the hallway and just curled up," she said.
Read more of her evidence

Ringleader Mohammad Sidique Khan, 30, detonated his device at Edgware Road.

The bomb, on a westbound Circle Line train heading towards Paddington, exploded in the second carriage close to the second set of double doors. It killed six people.

The inquests heard that although the bomb went off at 0850BST, the emergency services only reached the station at 0912.

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