7 July London bombings

CLICKABLE Find out more about the victims and survivors of the Aldgate bomb attack

Lee Baisden Richard Gray Anne Moffat Richard Ellery Philip Duckworth Benedetta Ciaccia Bruce Lait Lee Baisden Richard Gray Anne Moffat Benedetta Ciaccia Richard Ellery Fiona Stevenson Carrie Taylor Martine Wiltshire Andrew Brown Carrie Taylor Fiona Stevenson Martine Wiltshire Andrew Brown Philip Duckworth Bruce Lait

Source: 7 July inquests - all positions are approximate and based on witness statements

Wreckage of the second carriage after the blast

Image from video footage inside the carriage

Lee Baisden

Age: 34

Lee Baisden

Mr Baisden was standing right next to the bomber Shehzad Tanweer. The accountant worked for the London Fire & Emergency Planning Authority and had recently set up home with his boyfriend, but also spent a lot of time looking after his widowed mother. He travelled to Liverpool Street from Romford, Essex, and got on the Circle line on his way to work in Westminster. On 7 July he had left home an hour later than usual.
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Richard Gray

Age: 41

Richard Gray

Mr Gray, a father of two, was a tax accountant who commuted to London from Ipswich. One friend described him as "a gentleman of modest disposition, charm, courtesy and subtle humour and above all he was a family man". Those who knew him said he was happiest when playing for Ipswich & East Suffolk Hockey Club, which he founded. Mr Gray was standing opposite bomber Shehzad Tanweer.
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Anne Moffat

Age: 48

Anne Moffat

Anne Moffat was head of marketing and communications for Girlguiding UK. She had joined the organisation as an 18-year-old and had risen through the ranks. Ms Moffat was standing in the middle of the carriage between both sets of doors, close to the bomber. She commuted from Harlow, Essex, to her office in Victoria. Colleague Muriel Dunn said: "Her loss is a terrible tragedy and she will be greatly missed."
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Benedetta Ciaccia

Age: 30

Benedetta Ciaccia

The Italian-born business analyst was preparing for her wedding when she was killed at Aldgate. She lived in Norwich with her fiance Fiaz Bhatti and commuted every day to her job at Pearson Publishing in cental London. She was standing in the carriageway opposite the bomber and the evidence indicates she died instantly. Her fiance spent a week on London's streets with a homemade missing person poster, hoping she may have survived.
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Richard Ellery

Age: 21

Richard Ellery

Shopworker Mr Ellery had recently started working for Jessops Cameras in Ipswich and was on a rare trip to the capital on the morning of 7 July. First aiders tried unsuccessfully to save him at the scene. His father, brother and flatmate searched for him in London, until his death was confirmed. The family said he had been "a fun-loving boy, full of enthusiasm for life".
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Fiona Stevenson

Age: 29

Fiona Stevenson

Miss Stevenson was a talented lawyer with an "infectious laugh" on her way to Hammersmith Magistrates Court. Her firm described her as "hard-working, conscientious and supremely able", driven by her determination to represent the weak. She grew up in the Chelmsford area and had friends around the world. Her family said she was passionate about human rights and wanted to work for the United Nations.
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Carrie Taylor

Age: 24

Lee Baisden

Miss Taylor, who had begun to write a novel, was on her way to work at the Royal Society of Arts. She regularly commuted from Billericay, Essex, with her mother, June. Mrs Taylor described how they would always kiss goodbye at Liverpool Street and how her daughter would turn and wave until out of view. "I'm so very glad that the last picture I have of her is smiling and waving at me," Mrs Taylor said.
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Martine Wiltshire

Age: 38

Martine Wiltshire

Paralympic hopeful Martine Wiltshire, nee Wright, was just feet away from the bomber when the device went off. She lost both legs in the blast. "I recall a white light in front of my eyes and a feeling of being thrown from side to side," she said. Ms Wiltshire wept as she told the inquest how she owed her life to off-duty police officer Elizabeth Kenworthy, who gave her a belt to apply as a tourniquet to stem the bleeding.
Read more of her evidence

Andrew Brown

Age: unknown

Andrew Brown

Airport worker Andrew Brown, who lost a leg in the bombing, blacked out for 15 minutes after the blast. When he came round he first thought he had been electrocuted, but only realised how badly wounded he was when he tried to stand up to assist others in the train. "As soon as I was conscious, I became aware of people moaning and calling for help," he said.
Read more of his evidence

Bruce Lait

Age: 29

Bruce Lait

The professional dancer from Ipswich was sitting reading a newspaper next to his dance partner further along the carriage from the bomber. Mr Lait suffered minor burns, cuts and burst eardrums and remains partially deaf. He told the inquest how he held the hand of victim Fiona Stevenson until she died. "I tried to comfort her," he said.
Read more of his evidence

Philip Duckworth

Age: 41

Philip Duckworth

The investment banker was so close to Shehzad Tanweer that he was blinded in one eye by a fragment of the bomber's shin-bone. Mr Duckworth described how he was thrown onto the tracks by the force of the blast and drifted in and out of consciousness. Coroner Lady Justice Hallett said his was "an astonishing story" and that he had reduced the court to silence.
Read more of his evidence

On 7 July 2005, four suicide bombers with rucksacks full of explosives attacked central London, killing 52 people and injuring more than 770.

It was the worst single terrorist atrocity on British soil.

Three bombs went off just before 0850 BST on Tube trains near Aldgate and Edgware Road stations, and on another travelling between King's Cross and Russell Square.

There was a fourth and final explosion about an hour later on a double-decker bus in Tavistock Square, not far from King's Cross.

Inquests into the deaths of the 52 people who died that day began in October 2010 and are expected to last a number of months.

The hearings are looking at how they died, the emergency services' response, plans for dealing with such terrorist incidents and, critically, whether the bombers could have been stopped.

Evidence has included plans of the attacked tube carriages and double-decker bus, which show approximate locations of the bombers, those killed and the survivors. All locations are approximate and based on witness statements - some of which may conflict.

The inquests first heard evidence from the bombing on an eastbound Circle Line train between Liverpool Street and Aldgate, where Shehzad Tanweer, aged 22, detonated his device.

The explosion at the rear of the second carriage killed seven people.

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