7 July London bombings

CLICKABLE Find out more about the victims and survivors of the Russell Square bomb attack

james_adams samantha_badham philip_beer anna_brandt ciaran_cassidy elizabet_daplyn arthur_frederick karolina_gluck gamze_gunoral lee_harris ojara_ikeagwu emily_jenkins adrian_johnson helen_jones susan_levy shelley micheal_matsushita james_mayes behnaz_mozakka mihaela_otto atique_sharifi ihab_slimane christian_small

A still from footage taken by emergency services after the blast

Source: 7 July inquests - all positions are approximate and based on witness statements

monika_suchoka mala_trivedi rachelle_chung_for_yuen paul_mitchell lilian_ajayi paul_glennerster gill_hicks alison_mccarthy philip_patsalos

James Adams

Age: 32

James Adams

A church deacon from Bretton in Peterborough, Mr Adams was a deeply Christian man. The mortgage adviser was caught in the Piccadilly Line blast while on his way to work in the Strand. He called his mother from King's Cross to let her know he had arrived in London safely and was about to board the tube. His parents said: "James was a deeply loved son and brother, who lived and loved life to the full."
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Samantha Badham

Age: 35

Samantha Badham

On the day of the bombings, Ms Badham, a web designer, had left her car at home and taken the Tube to work with her partner, Lee Harris, ahead of plans to meet friends that evening. Both were killed by the explosion. At the inquest, medics recalled finding the couple lying next to each other on the tracks, their legs entwined. They were buried together after a joint funeral service in Herefordshire.
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Philip Beer

Age: 22

Philip Beer

The hair stylist from Hertfordshire boarded the Tube at King's Cross with his friend Patrick Barnes. Mr Beer was on his way to work at a salon in Knightsbridge when the explosion happened. His colleagues remembered him as "a born entertainer" who "lived life to the full". His family asked mourners at his funeral to wear brightly-coloured clothes. His body was carried in a pink coffin.
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Anna Brandt

Age: 41

Anna Brandt

Originally from Poland, Ms Brandt had been living in London for three years when she was killed in the bombing. On 7 July she left her home in Wood Green, north London, and set off for Hammersmith, where she worked as a cleaner. But she never arrived at work, sparking a desperate search by her brother Pawel Iskryznski. She had two daughters. One had arrived in the UK on the day of the explosions to visit her mother.
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Ciaran Cassidy

Age: 22

Ciaran Cassidy

Mr Cassidy, brought up in north London, was on his way to work on the morning of the attacks. He was planning a trip to Australia, for which he had been saving for several months while working as a shop assistant for a printing company in Chancery Lane. "He didn't care for politics or war," said his close friend Joe Hayes at Mr Cassidy's funeral, "but for his family, his friends, for his football and his weekend drink."
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Elizabeth Daplyn

Age: 26

Elizabeth Daplyn

A talented artist and musician, Ms Daplyn lived in north London with her partner Rob Brennan. They parted at 0810 BST on 7 July on their way to work and Ms Daplyn boarded the Piccadilly Line train to head to her job as an administrator at University College Hospital. In a statement her family said she left behind "dozens of people who loved and admired her, including her boyfriend Rob, parents Pam and Mike and sister Eleanor".
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Arthur Frederick

Age: 60

Arthur Frederick

Mr Frederick, a museum security guard living in north London, was born in Grenada, but moved to the neighbouring island of Montserrat as a young man. After a glittering 31-year career as a police officer, he moved to London in 1997. He was a keen musician and had a calypso hit in Montserrat. His son, Astrid Wade, said: "I still hear his songs on the radio and it brings back his memory to me. I do miss him."
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Karolina Gluck

Age: 29

Karolina Gluck

Ms Gluck, who boarded the train at Finsbury Park, was heading to work in Russell Square where she worked as a receptionist at the Goodenough College. Polish-born Ms Gluck had followed her twin sister Magda to London three years earlier. She was planning to leave that night for Paris for a romantic, long weekend with her boyfriend Richard Deer, who nicknamed her "sunshine" because of her lively and warm nature.
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Gamze Gunoral

Age: 24

Gamze Gunoral

Ms Gunoral, a Turkish national, left her aunt's house in north London for her language college in Hammersmith, west London, on 7 July. She had graduated from the University of Marmara, Istanbul, as an actuary. She worked in the finance department of Gisad, Turkey's largest textile export company, and came to London to improve her English. Osman Hokelek, an administrator at her school said she was "a lovely girl".
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Lee Harris

Age: 30

Lee Harris

The architect had left his bike at home on 7 July, mindful of a site meeting in Heathrow later that day. He also planned to meet his partner, Samantha Badham, after work in central London. Ms Badham died in the blast, while Mr Harris was taken to the Royal Free Hospital with serious head injuries. He was in a coma for eight days and died on 15 July. The pair were described as a "devoted couple".
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Ojara Ikeagwu

Age: 56

Ojara Ikeagwu

Mrs Ikeagwu, a mother-of-three from Luton, was travelling to work as a social worker with Hounslow social services in west London via King's Cross. Before her death, Mrs Ikeagwu had helped hundreds of adults with learning difficulties in London and hundreds more children in her homeland of Nigeria to get free schooling. Her husband, Dr Okorafor Ikeagwu, said his family had struggled to get over his wife's death.
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Emily Jenkins

Age: 24

Emily Jenkins

Ms Jenkins, who had dreams of becoming a midwife, was on her way to work when the bomb exploded. Her half-brother James Bowles heard from her at 0845 BST when she was at King's Cross station and about to head towards Russell Square. Ms Jenkins had lived in South America, Spain, Australia and Cornwall before settling in London. Her parents Sarah and Nick Jenkins said she had been on a path of fulfilment when she was killed.
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Adrian Johnson

Age: 37

Adrian Johnson

Mr Johnson, a father-of-two from Nottinghamshire, was a keen sports enthusiast and enjoyed golf, playing hockey at county level and supporting Mansfield Town Football Club. A product technical manager for Burberry, he was returning to work in London from Nottinghamshire on the day of the attacks. His family said: "Adrian was a wonderful, caring, family man who adored his wife and two young children."
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Helen Jones

Age: 28

Helen Jones

Ms Jones grew up in Templand, Dumfriesshire, but moved to London for work. At the time of the blast, she was living in Holloway, north London and working for Phoenix Equity Partners. She had bought a flat only two weeks before she died. Her family said she was a "shining star" who loved parties and traditional folk music. They said she loved travelling and her holidays had taken her all round the world.
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Susan Levy

Age: 53

Susan Levy

The first victim of the 7 July bombings to be formally identified, Mrs Levy was travelling from her home in Hertfordshire to the City, where she worked as a legal secretary. She was described by her husband, Harry, as a "devoted and much-loved wife and mother of two sons" - Daniel and Jamie. On the morning of the attacks she had, as usual, shared half the journey with her younger son. They went their separate ways at Finsbury Park.
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Shelley Mather

Age: 26

Shelley Mather

The only New Zealander to die in the London bombings, Ms Mather had been living in the capital for three years. She held dual passports with New Zealand and Irish citizenship. Prior to the attacks, Ms Mather, who had a passion for indoor cricket, had been temping as an administrator and looking forward to a trip to Greece in late July. Her family said she was "a beautiful and vibrant girl who was truly loving, caring and giving".
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Michael Matsushita

Age: 37

Michael Matsushita

Mr Matsushita, brought up in the US, was just one month into his new London life with his British girlfriend, and just three days into a new job based in Holborn when he was killed. He was born in Vietnam, the son of a South Vietnamese soldier killed in the conflict when he was just five months old. At the age of three, he and his mother Muoi emigrated to New York to join her new husband David, a US aid worker.
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James Mayes

Age: 28

James Mayes

Mr Mayes, an analyst at the Healthcare Commission, a body that strives to improve the NHS, was on his way to a seminar when he was killed. He lived with a friend in north London, and had just returned from holiday the evening before the attacks. Friend Rohen Kapur said Mr Mayes enjoyed life to the full. "James was the lovable, unpunctual, irritating, wonderful man that I miss terribly. The world is all the poorer for his passing."
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Behnaz Mozakka

Age: 47

Behnaz Mozakka

The Iranian-born mother-of-two was taking her regular commute from Finchley to Russell Square to her job as a biomedical officer at Great Ormond Street Children's Hospital - a role she loved. Her husband Nader Mozakka described her as "a very peaceful person" who "hated violence". Mrs Mozakka's daughter Saba, aged 24 when she lost her mother, said that she, her father Nader and brother Saeed had been "shattered" by their loss.
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Mihaela Otto

Age: 46

Mihaela Otto

Ms Otto, who liked to be known as Michelle, was on her way to her job as a dental technician in Knightsbridge. Brought up in Romania, she had moved to London in 1984, following in the footsteps of her sister Dania Gorodi, who had married and settled in the city. She lived in Mill Hill, north London, with her mother Elena Draganescu, 78, her sister Dania and her husband Matthew, along with their two teenage sons, Leah and Michael.
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Atique Sharifi

Age: 24

Atique Sharifi

Mr Sharifi, a young Afghan Muslim, was one of the few members of his family to escape death at the hands of the Taliban. But three years after fleeing Kabul, he was killed in the Russell Square bombing. A resident of Hounslow in west London, Mr Sharifi had been studying English at West Thames College, where he drew praise from staff. His sister Farishta, said Mr Sharifi was not just her brother, but also her friend.
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Ihab Slimane

Age: 24

Ihab Slimane

Mr Slimane had left his home in Lyon, France, to spend a summer improving his English in London, three weeks before he died in the attacks. Of Tunisian origin, Mr Slimane had got a job as a waiter at a French restaurant in the West End, a home in Finsbury Park and made many new friends. His long-term ambitions were in computer programming and he had intended to return to his studies in France in September.
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Christian Small

Age: 28

Christian Small

Mr Small had left his flat in Walthamstow, east London, to make his way to work in Holborn, in advertising sales, on the morning of 7 July. Mr Small, a keen hurdler, had recently been on a life-changing trip to West Africa, in which he researched his family origins. It had inspired him to change his name to Njoya Diawara-Small, which he believed was a better reflection of his character, Njoya Diawara meaning "strong in spirit".
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Monika Suchocka

Age: 23

Monika Suchocka

Ms Suchocka grew up in Dabrowka Malborska, northern Poland, and had only arrived in London two months before the bombings. The trainee accountant, who lived in Archway, had found a job and joined a choir. She was on her way to work at an accountancy firm in West Kensington when she died. The last contact she had with anyone was at 0840 BST, when she sent a text message to a colleague to say she was running late due to tube delays.
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Mala Trivedi

Age: 51

Mala Trivedi

Ms Trivedi, a radiographer, was caught up in the blast as she travelled to work from her Wembley home. With more than 30 years of experience, Mrs Trivedi was a manager in the X-ray department at London's Great Ormond Street Hospital for Sick Children. Dr Cathy Owens, from the hospital, said Ms Trivedi's dedication to her job and her "cheery polite nature" made her a "very popular member of the close-knit team".
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Gill Hicks

Age: 42

Gill Hicks

Ms Hicks lost both legs in the blast but saved her own life by tying tourniquets to her severed limbs. She told the inquest she thought she was having a heart attack when the bomb exploded. She passed out and awoke on a seat to discover her injuries. She ripped her scarf in half and tied it around each leg before lifting what remained of them over the armrest of a seat. She was praised by the coroner for her "indomitable spirit".
Read more of her evidence

Lilian Ajayi

Age: Unknown

Lilian Ajayi

Ms Ajayi was going to sit down on a seat but gave it up for another female passenger. That passenger later died. She described hearing a "boom" and then seeing scenes of the injured piled up "like a laundry basket". She recalled trying to help a man, but realised his leg injury was too severe to move him. She also did not want to tell him about the extent of his injuries, she said.
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Paul Mitchell

Age: Unknown

Paul Mitchell

Mr Mitchell, who was on his way to work on Regent Street, told the inquest the carriage had been crammed when "an extremely loud pop and a very bright yellow light" went off. He was thrown to the ground by the force of the blast and recalls "complete and utter pandemonium". Mr Mitchell attributes his survival to fellow passenger Julie Gruen, who helped him tie a tourniquet around his damaged leg using her coat and a sanitary towel.
Read more of his evidence

Alison McCarthy

Age: Unknown

Alison McCarthy

Alison McCarthy, who joined the train at Finsbury Park, described how she passed out when the bomb went off. She woke up under injured people and bodies and her feet were embedded with glass. But she went on to help fellow passengers by applying tourniquets and keeping them conscious through conversation. "It didn't occur to me to leave," she said.
Read more of her evidence

Philip Patsalos

Age: 58

Philip Patsalos

Prof Patsalos, who lost a leg in the blast, told the inquest he survived because he was sitting in his "favourite" seat. He told the coroner he would have been killed if he had been sitting in his second favourite seat, which was inches from where the bomb detonated. The epilepsy specialist at University College London's Institute of Neurology said: "How I survived, I don't know. Somebody saved me... I'm grateful."
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Paul Glennerster

Age: Unknown

Paul Glennerster

Paul Glennerster told the inquest how he "picked up" his badly damaged limb and "hopped" off the bombed train. The keen footballer managed to get himself on to the tracks before being stretchered to the surface. He was helped by train driver Thomas Nairn, who used his belt to apply a tourniquet to Mr Glennerster's leg. Mr Glennerster was praised by the coroner for his "amazing presence of mind".
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Rachelle Chung For Yuen

Age: 27

Rachelle Chung For Yuen

Mrs Chung For Yuen, an accountant from Mauritius, was heading to work in Piccadilly Circus on the day of the attacks. Because of signal failures sending all Northern Line trains along the Bank branch, through King's Cross, Mrs Chung For Yuen disembarked at King's Cross and boarded the Piccadilly Line. Her husband Billy, 29, also from Mauritius, said she cherished her family "above anything else".
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The most deadly attack on 7 July occurred on the Piccadilly Line between King's Cross and Russell Square.

Germaine Lindsay, 19, detonated his bomb next to the rear set of double doors in the front carriage of the packed train just after it pulled out of King's Cross station. Twenty-six people were killed.

Survivor Paul Mitchell told the inquest the carriage had been crammed when "an extremely loud pop and a very bright yellow light" went off.

"It all happened so quickly. There was complete and utter pandemonium," he said.

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