UK

Newspaper review: News Corp's management questioned

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Media captionA look at the first editions of the UK papers

The future of the management of News Corporation as the phone-hacking scandal continues is the focus of Sunday's newspapers.

Reporting from New York, The Observer's Paul Harris says the survival of the company may depend on James Murdoch, the "heir presumptive", leaving.

He says rebel shareholders "despair" at the family control of the company.

The Sunday Telegraph claims Mr Murdoch's position as the chairman of BSkyB is "under review".

'Gloves off'

The papers are also looking ahead to Rupert and James Murdoch and Rebekah Brooks appearing before the Culture and Media Select Committee on Tuesday.

The Sunday Express says it will be an event to match anything on Sky Sports when the "gloves will come off".

Committee member Tom Watson tells the Sunday Mirror the committee will be "respectful yet forensic".

The Observer says MPs will be given legal advice on how far they can push the Murdochs for answers.

Violent history

Away from phone hacking, the Sunday Express investigates the illegal alcohol trade after five men died in an explosion in Lincolnshire.

It says the trade is worth £1bn a year and vodka, which is 51% proof, is sold in pubs and off-licences.

Meanwhile the Mail on Sunday says women who use the internet for dating may be able to find out from the police if men have a history of violence .

It comes as a woman was murdered by a man she met on Facebook.

'Reckless and stupid'

Some of the Sunday columnists share their opinions about Charlie Gilmour, the son of the Pink Floyd guitarist David Gilmour, who was jailed for violent disorder during a protest in London last year.

Barbara Ellen writes in The Observer that while his behaviour is not commendable, it's crucial that people show solidarity by deciding to protest.

Liz Jones writes in the Mail on Sunday that he was "reckless and stupid", but at least he showed concern about government cuts rather than apathy.

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