UK

Paper review: Murdoch splashed across papers

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Media captionA look at the first editions of the UK papers with Nigel Nelson

"Murdoch eats humble pie," is how the Daily Telegraph and the Daily Express sum up the News Corp chief's appearance before the Culture select committee.

Rupert Murdoch's opening that it was the most "humble" day of his life also gives the headlines for the Financial Times, the Sun and the Guardian .

Tuesday's events at the Wilson Room in Portcullis House make the front page of every single paper.

The Financial Times found Mr Murdoch's performance "hesitant and deferential".

Contrite

But the Daily Telegraph thinks he sounded "angry, obdurate and self-righteous".

The Sun is sympathetic, finding its boss "remorseful" and contrite.

Similarly, its News Corp stablemate, the Times, feels that the Murdochs and Rebekah Brooks answered the questions put to them "politely and graciously".

The paper is less impressed with MPs on the select committee however, concluding that "Jeremy Paxman need not fear for his job".

Gotcha!

The Daily Mirror and the Daily Star focus on the protestor who hit Rupert Murdoch in the face with a custard pie.

Here, the Daily Star lifts its headline, "Gotcha!" from a notorious Sun front page of the 1980s.

The attack and his wife's intervention are manna from heaven for sketchwriters.

At Wendi Deng's intervention "Kung fu!" cries the Daily Mail's Quentin Letts, while in the Sun, Trevor Kavanagh salutes the "deadly grace of the crouching tiger".

European economy

Meanwhile the Daily Mail is concerned with what it calls the "real scandal MPs ignore".

It says Parliament is "fiddling" over 'phone-hacking, while the European economy "burns".

The Times is similarly concerned that while "eyes were fixed" on the drama unfolding at Westminster, a different storm was brewing in Europe.

Investors are losing patience with eurozone leaders "still dithering over how to shore up Greece," it says.

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Media captionA look at the first editions of the UK papers

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