UK

Newspaper review: Papers assess Libyan rebel's death

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Media captionA look at the first editions of the UK papers

The Observer sees the murder of Libyan rebel General Abdel Fatah Younes by fellow rebels as evidence that efforts to topple Col Gaddafi are in disarray.

It says it raises doubts over the wisdom of the UK government's decision to recognise the rebel leadership.

The Mail on Sunday believes the assassination has "cast serious doubt over Britain's Libyan intervention".

Meanwhile, its Africa correspondent describes meeting the general after a "James Bond-style car scramble".

Policy mess

The Sunday Times agrees, saying: "The West's intervention , which was supposed to make things better, has created yet another foreign policy mess."

The paper finds it "difficult to be anything other than pessimistic about how this will end".

According to the Sunday Telegraph, the timing of the general's murder could not have been worse.

But it believes Nato should press on, while trying to foster political unity among the insurgents.

Modern marriage

Pictures of the wedding of Zara Phillips and Mike Tindall appear on nearly all the front pages.

The Independent on Sunday talks of "a thoroughly modern marriage".

The Sunday Times calls it the "not so royal wedding" but says there was a throng of about 10,000 people on the streets of Edinburgh, more than three times the police estimate.

The Sunday Express and Mail on Sunday both come with 16-page souvenir pull-outs on the wedding.

Famine fears

The Independent on Sunday highlights "a terrible new front in Africa's deadly famine".

It says Kenya is on the brink of its own famine while the situation in Somalia deteriorates.

Meanwhile, the Sunday Mirror welcomes Thursday's Supreme Court ruling giving more than 1,000 former servicemen the right to seek compensation.

It comes more than 50 years after they were exposed to radiation during nuclear weapons tests by the UK in the South Pacific.

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