UK

Newspaper review: Focus on hunt for Gaddafi

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Media captionA look at the first editions of the UK papers

The situation in Libya and the search for Col Gaddafi after his compound in Tripoli was captured remains top of the agenda for most of Thursday's newspapers.

One possibility, says the Express, is that he's escaped from the facility using the network of tunnels under Tripoli.

One former aide tells the Times : "He may dress in women's clothes and head for the Algerian border or Chad".

The Independent says he could have made it safely through to his old stomping ground in Sirte, where he was born.

'Ghostly'

Today's papers also relish the chance to print pictures from inside Gaddafi's ransacked Tripoli compound.

The Sun has a picture of its reporter sitting on a teacup ride and playing on his table football.

The Daily Mail writes of a "surreal fantasy" and finds, among other items, a Hamley's shopping bag and a copy of the Sunday Telegraph from last October.

The Guardian also describes the "ghostly" scene at the Libyan prime minister's hastily-abandoned office.

SAS 'guidance'

Many papers report that no effort is being spared to look for Col Gaddafi, who now has a £1m "dead or alive" bounty on his head.

According to the Telegraph, SAS forces are helping guide the rebels' search.

The Times reports that an American surveillance aircraft is playing a key role in the search.

The Daily Mail says the eavesdropping centre at GCHQ in Cheltenham will be trying to intercept any calls made by Gaddafi from satellite phones.

Dangerous curry

The Daily Express is one of the few papers not leading on Libya. It reports on a new test for Alzheimer's.

The "revolutionary check" spots the disease years before symptoms appear, allowing earlier treatments and delaying its onset, says the paper.

Inside the pages of the Daily Star, meanwhile, Britain's "hottest curry" is revealed - the Dilshad Inferno.

Diners at the Staffordshire restaurant must sign a disclaimer acknowledging the dangers of the spicy dish.

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