UK

Newspaper review: Papers cover Clarkson controversy

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Media captionA look at the first editions of the UK papers

Jeremy Clarkson is pictured on the front pages of many papers following his controversial comments about public sector workers who went on strike.

The Daily Mail says he is jetting away from "the storm over his 'execute strikers' joke that backfired".

The Daily Mirror notes that Clarkson first insisted he'd done nothing wrong, before changing his mind and apologising a few hours later.

"Clarkson, the BBC and a case of foot in mouth" says the Times.

Governor's warning

The Financial Times says a "last-ditch" rescue plan for the euro-zone has started to take shape.

This comes after the head of European Central Bank, Mario Draghi, hinted it might adopt a more aggressive strategy.

The Daily Telegraph believes Germany is the key to solving the crisis and calls on the country to take action.

The warning from the governor of the Bank of England, Sir Mervyn King, that the euro crisis puts Britain in extreme danger, is highlighted by the Times.

The Guardian is among those papers which reports on the government's happiness survey, which found that the average "life satisfaction" rating was 7.4 out of 10.

"Money can't buy you love," says the paper, "or much else that makes life worth living".

It also points out that numerous studies have shown that rising incomes don't mean extra contentment.

But the Daily Express is angry that £2m was spent on the survey.

Driving lessons

The Daily Star features a bus driver who's still at school. Joseff Edwards passed his passenger vehicle test at the age of 18.

He now puts a bus driver's uniform over his school one, drives pupils 10 miles, parks at school, then has lessons.

The Mail reports that wasps seem much cleverer than we first thought and never forget a friendly face.

Scientists at Michigan University found that paper wasps, different from common UK wasps, can recognise friends.

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