Kenya elections: Maps and graphics

Kenyans have been voting in the country's general election, following a campaign that has been overshadowed by memories of the violence which unexpectedly erupted after the disputed contest of December 2007. President Mwai Kibaki is not seeking re-election - his partner in the current coalition, Prime Minister Raila Odinga, is a front-runner in the presidential race.

Title page: Behind the Kenya elections
Map of Kenya showing distribution of ethnic groups Kenya is braced for general elections, which some fear could see a repeat of the horrific nationwide violence which followed the 2007 polls. Kenya’s 42 million people are divided into more than 40 different ethnic and linguistic groups and many Kenyans vote along ethnic lines. Some of the groups have long-standing disputes over access to land or water for animals, which periodically lead to outbreaks of deadly violence.
Map of Kenya showing election results 2007 Many politicians feel the route to power is through ethnic alliances. In 2007, Raila Odinga's ODM was mainly supported by his Luo community, their neighbours the Luhya, ethnic Kalenjins and others. Kenya's largest group, the Kikuyu, broadly supported the PNU and Kikuyu President Mwai Kibaki, while Kalonzo Musyoka's ODM-Kenya was largely backed by his Kamba people south and east of Nairobi.
Map showing three towns in Rift Valley affected by violence post 2007 election After the election, ODM supporters accused the PNU of rigging the polls and staged street protests. These quickly turned violent and degenerated into tit-for-tat ethnic attacks, especially in the densely populated and ethnically mixed Rift Valley, where Kikuyu and Kalenjin compete for land. Thirty-five ethnic Kikuyus were burned to death in a church at Eldoret. There were also deadly clashes in Naivasha and Nakuru.
Internally displaced mum and baby after 2007 election More than 1,000 people were killed and about 600,000 people fled their homes. Five years later, the UNHCR estimates about 100,000 people are still living in tented camps around the country. With such memories still raw, some people fear the elections could lead to a new outbreak of violence, as seen during the party nominations in parts of the country earlier this year.
Kenyatta, Odinga and Ruto, showing Ruto switched sides Presidential candidate Uhuru Kenyatta and his running mate - William Ruto - are due to stand trial at the International Criminal Court in April for crimes against humanity. They are accused of organising their supporters to attack each other in the violence which erupted after the last election. Mr Ruto, a Kalenjin, backed Raila Odinga in 2007, but he has since switched sides. Both men deny the charges.

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