Two police and crime commissioners under investigation

Simon Hayes (l) and Winston Roddick Both Simon Hayes (left) and Winston Roddick stood as independent candidates

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Two police and crime commissioners are being investigated by the police watchdog after they were accused of falsifying their eligibility for the posts.

The allegations against Simon Hayes, the PCC for Hampshire, and Winston Roddick, the PCC for north Wales, were reported by the Mail on Sunday.

The Independent Police Complaints Commission (IPCC) said its investigation was at an "early stage".

Both men deny any wrongdoing.

Police and crime commissioners are elected officials, responsible for appointing the chief constable of their force, setting local policing priorities, and overseeing their force's budget. They replaced police authorities in 41 force areas across England and Wales.

The legislation which created the post and paved the way for the election of its first occupants in 2012 says candidates must be registered on the electoral roll on both the day they are nominated as a candidate and the day of the election.

'Right and proper'

The Mail on Sunday newspaper said the IPCC was investigating allegations that the two men had listed addresses in their respective police force areas when in fact they had been living elsewhere.

Start Quote

I am quite content that it is being investigated”

End Quote Simon Hayes PCC for Hampshire

It is an offence to provide a false statement on nomination papers and could invalidate a candidate's election.

It could also potentially result in a criminal conviction and imprisonment, which would automatically disqualify a commissioner from their post.

Mr Hayes, who stood as an independent candidate, told the BBC he denied the claims.

"I am content that I completed the nomination form correctly," he said.

"There is an accusation which is being investigated by the IPCC. I am quite content that it is being investigated."

Mr Roddick, also an independent, said: "The Independent Police Complaints Commission is investigating a complaint against me by a resident of north Wales."

He dismissed the newspaper's claim that the watchdog had launched an "undercover sting" operation.

The resident had said "that on one of my nomination forms for the police and crime commissioner election last November I gave an address which was not my home address and thereby committed an election offence," he continued.

"I believe I acted in a right and proper manner, but the IPCC is required to investigate such complaints and is doing so in a perfectly proper and transparent way."

Crimestoppers

An IPCC spokesman said: "We can confirm that we have had referrals and our investigation is at an early stage."

In his election statement, which was published online, Mr Roddick listed his address as in Caernarfon.

Mr Roddick, 72, is a QC and one of Wales' leading barristers. He was Wales' first Counsel General, the most senior legal adviser to the Welsh assembly.

He was elected as an independent in North Wales, ahead of the Labour candidate in last November's poll.

Before taking up his PCC post, Mr Hayes had been the chairman of Crimestoppers Hampshire and Isle of Wight.

He was previously a Conservative district and county councillor and leader of New Forest District Council.

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