Royal Mail issues World War One stamps

Stamp featuring Pte William Tickle Pte William Tickle was enlisted on 7 September 1914

Related Stories

Royal Mail is to publish a series of stamps to commemorate World War One over the next five years.

The first stamps will be issued in July and include a portrait of 15-year-old solider Pte William Tickle, who was killed at the Battle of the Somme in 1916.

Stamps featuring a painting of a poppy and lines from the poem For The Fallen will also be issued in July.

Royal Mail said 30 stamps would be made over five years to recognise a war that "changed the course of world history".

The stamps will honour the contribution of Commonwealth countries, the armed forces, non-combatants and women.

Stamp featuring line from For The Fallen For The Fallen was written by poet Laurence Binyon
Stamp featuring painting of a poppy by Fiona Strickland Botanical artist Fiona Strickland's Poppy stamp will be issued in July

Helen Grant, the minister for the WW1 centenary, praised Royal Mail's "long and distinguished history of recording special events and anniversaries with commemorative stamps".

The power of post

Letters written by poet Rupert Brooke during WW1

"Postal workers played a really important role in the war with many displaying gallantry and heroism of the highest order," she said.

"I hope that these stamps will help to bring home the meaning of the centenary to everyone that sees them."

About 75,000 postal workers fought in the war.

Royal Mail's own regiment, the Post Office Rifles, was formed in the 1860s to protect its buildings from attack.

About 1,800 of its solders were killed - and 4,500 injured - during the war.

Royal Mail consulted with the Imperial War Museums, senior figures in the armed forces and organisations including the Royal British Legion before producing the stamps.

It has also published a database of memorials that commemorate those who died in WW1.

Discover how 12 million letters reach WW1 soldiers each week and more about the WW1 Centenary.

More on This Story

Related Stories

The BBC is not responsible for the content of external Internet sites

More UK stories

RSS

Features & Analysis

Elsewhere on the BBC

  • UnderwaterHidden depths

    How do you explore the bottom of the ocean? BBC Future finds out

Programmes

  • The challenge is to drop a bottle of water within 100 metres of this dummyClick Watch

    The race to get water – transported by drone – to a man stuck in remote Australia

BBC © 2014 The BBC is not responsible for the content of external sites. Read more.

This page is best viewed in an up-to-date web browser with style sheets (CSS) enabled. While you will be able to view the content of this page in your current browser, you will not be able to get the full visual experience. Please consider upgrading your browser software or enabling style sheets (CSS) if you are able to do so.