UK

UK What Next? Mark Easton's devolution road trip

Moving more powers from Westminster to the nations and regions of Britain has moved up the political agenda since the Scottish Referendum in September.

The BBC's Home Editor Mark Easton took a road trip around the UK looking at how devolution could work - and testing the public appetite for change.

Day one: Downing Street to Winchester

The Chancellor of the Exchequer, George Osborne, has announced plans for an elected mayor of Greater Manchester to oversee regional issues and control billions of pounds of public money.

Meanwhile, the Local Government Associations of England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland are seeking a deal for more political power to be transferred to councils across the UK.

Mark starts his journey in Downing Street and asks whether the English really want more control over their own affairs.

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Media captionFrom Downing Street to Winchester

Day two: Could Cornwall be independent?

It is 10 years since a referendum on creating England's first regional assembly in the North East was decisively rejected.

But David Cameron's recent talk of a new constitutional settlement for England - following the Scottish referendum - has led some to suggest the idea should be revived.

Day two of Mark's trip takes him to Cornwall where there is a long tradition of political campaigning for Cornish self-government.

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Media captionCould Cornwall adopt devolution?

Day three: What lessons from Wales?

Wales has had its own elected Assembly since 1999, and has had the power to make its own laws since 2006.

Many areas of government are devolved to Cardiff, including health, education and culture, although others, such as defence, are still controlled by Westminster.

Plans to give the Assembly government responsibility for raising some of the money it spends are currently making their way through legislation.

On day three of his journey, Mark looks at the Welsh experience of devolution and asks whether it could hold lessons for England.

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Media captionWelsh lessons for English devolution

Day four: North of England

What could David Cameron's promise of a new UK constitution mean for the north of England?

In Yorkshire, some campaigners are calling for more devolved power.

On day four of his tour, Mark stops in Leeds to look at the options being explored for a more powerful north.

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Media captionWhat are the options for more power in the north of England?

Day Five: Scotland

Moving more powers from Westminster to the nations and regions of Britain has moved up the political agenda since the Scottish referendum in September.

The BBC's home editor Mark Easton took a road trip around the UK looking at how devolution could work - and testing the public appetite for change.

His journey ends in Scotland, where the debate about independence ignited the current soul searching about the future of the whole UK.

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Media captionJourney's end for Mark - but the story of further devolution has just begun

For more coverage of the issues explored in Mark Easton's road trip, look at BBC News Online's UK: What next? page.

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