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News Daily: First London attack victim named

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First London attack victim named

Image copyright Reuters
Image caption Chrissy Archibald moved to Europe to be with her fiance

Police say they know the identities of the three attackers who killed seven people in London and will release the details as soon as is operationally possible.

The first of their victims has been named as Chrissy Archibald, a Canadian national who had worked in a homeless shelter before moving to Europe to be with her fiance. A French national was also killed, according to the country's foreign minister.

Forty-eight people were injured as the attackers drove a van into pedestrians on London Bridge and then got out and stabbed people in nearby Borough Market. The Metropolitan Police said 36 people were in hospital, 21 of them in a "critical" condition.

The three suspects were shot dead within eight minutes of the first 999 call being received.

There will be a minute's silence for their victims at 11:00 BST on Tuesday. Here are the details of what we know so far about the attack.

Stars unite for Manchester

"The kind of love and unity that you're displaying is the medicine that the world really needs right now," said singer Ariane Grande, as 50,000 people gathered for a concert for the victims of last month's Manchester bombing and their families. Organisers of One Love Manchester say the event raised more than £2m. Justin Bieber, Coldplay, Liam Gallagher, Katy Perry, Miley Cyrus, Take That and the Black Eyed Peas were among the acts.

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Funeral for teenage Manchester victim

A funeral mass for 14-year-old Eilidh MacLeod, one of the victims of the Manchester attack, takes place on her home island of Barra, in the Outer Hebrides, later. Eilidh's parents have described her as "beautiful, popular and talented".

Parties argue over security

It's three days until the general election and the main parties have re-started their campaigns following a pause after the London Bridge attack. Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn has accused the government of trying to protect the public "on the cheap", criticising "police cuts" and saying officers should be able to "use whatever force is necessary" to save lives. But the Conservatives said Mr Corbyn, who has previously questioned the wisdom of a shoot-to-kill policy, was issuing "desperate promises and evasive soundbites". Prime Minister Theresa May will use a speech later to say she offers the leadership the country needs to ensure its security.

Analysis: Impact of London terror attack on campaign

By Laura Kuenssberg, political editor

Voters choose their political parties for all sorts of different reasons. But as this strange election hurtles towards its close, the demand of who can keep the country safe is firmly on the table.

Read Laura's full article

What the papers say

"Enough is enough" declare the Daily Mail and the Daily Express, echoing words used by the prime minister, as the newspapers report on the public's defiance following the London attack. "Monsters and heroes" says the Mirror, comparing the actions of the attackers and the police, while the Times's headline is "Massacre in the market".

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Today's look-ahead

Today The first United Nations Ocean Conference, aimed at improving the state of the world's seas, opens in New York.

14:00 Actor Bill Cosby goes on trial over accusations that he drugged and molested a former Temple University employee at his home in the Philadelphia suburbs in 2004.

On this day

1963 Secretary of State for War John Profumo resigns from the government, admitting he lied to Parliament about his relationship with a call girl.

From elsewhere

'The Handmaid's Tale reflects our child-obsessed society' (Telegraph)

Cleaning houses for two dollars (New Yorker)

Gentrification, post-Soviet style (The Atlantic)

The college admission essay about Papa John's (Washington Post)