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News Daily: Russian fury over sanctions and baby box concerns

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Russia furious over US sanctions

Donald Trump has signed off a bill backed by Congress which imposes fresh US sanctions on Russia - and Moscow has reacted furiously. Prime Minister Dmitry Medvedev said the move amounted to a "full-scale trade war" against his country that ended any hopes for improving relations.

Mr Trump himself only signed the Countering America's Adversaries Through Sanctions Act, which also applies sanctions to Iran and North Korea, reluctantly. He described it as "deeply flawed", arguing that he was able to make "better deals" overseas than Congress.

The sanctions - in response to alleged Russian meddling in last year's US election and its annexation of Crimea - come months after former US President Barack Obama expelled 35 Russian diplomats. Moscow announced this week that it was sending home 755 US diplomatic staff.

President Trump has repeatedly rejected any allegations - currently under investigation - that his campaign staff colluded with Russia to help him win the election.

Cot death charity raises concerns over baby boxes

A charity has raised concerns over the use of baby boxes, saying there is no evidence they help reduce the rate of sudden infant death syndrome, also known as cot death. Some NHS trusts give new parents the boxes - designed in Finland - filled with baby products but also useable as a bed. And they are due to be given out across Scotland, starting later this month. But the Lullaby Trust, an anti-cot death charity, said it would no longer allow its branded leaflets to be inserted in the boxes, as this implied it backed health claims for their use.

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DJ Evans loses listeners

He's been named as the BBC's highest paid star, but figures show that Radio 2 DJ Chris Evans has lost almost half a million listeners in the past year. The research body Rajar found the breakfast show presenter had drawn 9.01m people a week between April and June this year, down from 9.47m over the same period in 2016. Radio 1 rival Nick Grimshaw gained 350,000 listeners over the same period.

Analysis: What is India's president actually for?

By Soutik Biswas, India correspondent

The Indian presidency differs from most presidencies across the world. The president does not exercise executive powers - he is the head of the state, and is required by the constitution to act on the advice of ministers.

Read the full article

What the papers say

Tributes are paid across the press to the Duke of Edinburgh, who retired from public duty on Wednesday at the age of 96. "Thank you, Sir" is the Daily Express's headline, while the Daily Mail says: "Farewell, Sir. They don't make 'em like you these days." Meanwhile, the Guardian and the Sun lead with the breakthrough which has seen scientists modify human embryos to remove mutations that cause heart failure. And the Times reports that Highways England is considering covering motorways with "tents made from pollution-absorbing materials" to protect people living nearby.

Daily digest

Bosses' pay FTSE 100 chief executives see income fall 17% in a year

Mental health 91 patients wait more than a year for discharge from acute units

Mocha milkshake Ohio diner makes dying woman's last wish come true

Sharenting Should you post photos of your children on social media?

If you watch one thing today

Why doesn't everybody know about sickle cell?

If you listen to one thing today

Vic Reeves interviews Bob Mortimer

If you read one thing today

Image copyright Essoldo Pictures

Making a film about the young Morrissey

Today's lookahead

12:00 The Bank of England announces its latest interest rates decision - and publishes its quarterly inflation report.

19:45 The England women's football team take on hosts the Netherlands in the semi-final of the Euro 2017 championship.

On this day

1990 A weather station in Nailstone, Leicestershire, recorded a temperature of 37.1C, or 99F, the then highest yet known in Britain.

From elsewhere

Lessons from a survivalist summit (Guardian)

The civil war to end Harvard's fraternities (Vanity Fair)

Why didn't ancient Greeks think the sea was blue? (Aeon)

Fancy a night in a Danish crane? (Daily Telegraph)