England

UK teams train for terrorist attack

Mock attack
Image caption More than 150 emergency staff worked around the clock

Emergency services took part in a simulated terrorist attack at Tyne and Wear Fire and Rescue Service's headquarters.

Police, fire and search and rescue teams from across the UK took part.

The simulated attack included a device hidden in a workshop, two car bombs and a suicide bomber on a Metro train.

More than 150 emergency responders worked around the clock, in 10-hour shifts, for 52 hours from Friday until Sunday to deal with the five scenarios.

The detonations resulted in 80 mock casualties, ranging from the walking wounded to fatalities.

'Great test'

The exercise was organised and co-ordinated by Tyne and Wear Fire and Rescue Service and the Fire Service's National Resilience Assurance Team (NRAT).

Teams involved in Exercise Genesis were Urban Search and Rescue (USAR) teams from Tyne and Wear, West Yorkshire, Hereford and Worcester, Merseyside, Lincolnshire, Hampshire Fire and Rescue Services, Durham and Darlington Fire and Rescue Service, members of Northumbria Police and the North East Ambulance Service.

Image caption Tyne and Wear Fire and Rescue said major terrorist attacks were "increasingly likely"

Area Manager for Community Safety John Baines, of Tyne and Wear Fire and Rescue Service, said: "Unfortunately, the threat of major terrorist attacks has become increasingly likely in recent years, so it is important that the emergency services are prepared for the worst.

"This exercise was not only a great test of our team's skills, but also demonstrated the effective working of all the emergency services involved.

"The scale of devastation faced by the USAR teams during this weekend's operation can also be seen at large scale incidents or natural disasters, such as those that have occurred in other parts of the world recently.

"That's why exercises like Genesis are invaluable, as they allow us to deploy our specialist teams and put their skills and knowledge to the test under realistic conditions."

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