Jimmy Savile: Stoke Mandeville patient's abuse claim

Caroline Moore said her family didn't take her claims seriously

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A woman has claimed Jimmy Savile abused her when she was a 13-year-old patient at Stoke Mandeville Hospital.

Caroline Moore said Savile sexually assaulted her during a visit to the spinal injuries unit in 1971.

"He rammed his tongue down my throat... and walked off," said Ms Moore, who added her parents did not believe her because of the broadcaster's profile.

The hospital said it had "no record" of inappropriate behaviour by Savile but would work with the police.

The Metropolitan Police is pursuing 120 separate lines of inquiry into abuse allegations made against the BBC presenter, who died last year aged 84..

Officers said they had recorded eight allegations against him, including two rape claims, and there could be 30 victims.

'Bad man'

Speaking to BBC Scotland, Ms Moore, 53, of Clarkston, near Glasgow, said she was sitting in a corridor when Savile launched his wordless attack.

"He rammed it down my throat and then he just walked off.

"I told my family at the time: they didn't take it seriously because he was such a high-profile character."

She added: "Those days it was different relationship between parents and children. We didn't speak as freely to our parents as we do now.

"It was a completely different age. It was very frustrating for me.

"In childish terms, he was a bad man and bad men should be punished."

'Still upsets me'

She said she believed "without any doubt" other Stoke Mandeville patients must have been abused by Savile.

"I just wish he was alive to face it," she added. "I and lots of other people, I'm sure, feel cheated.

Jimmy Savile Savile was a regular visitor to Stoke Mandeville, raising millions for its spinal injuries centre

"After 40 years it still upsets me.

"He needs to be seen for what he was.

"He's a horrible person, and he was horrible with other patients there, but funnily enough nobody seemed to see it.

"He was powerful man and these types of places need funds.

"The most important thing is for people to know who the man really was. And if Stoke Mandeville patients need help, let them get help.

"I'm a strong person and it bothers me to this day."

In a statement released on Wednesday, Buckinghamshire Healthcare Trust said it was shocked to hear of the allegations and confirmed that police had contacted the hospital.

It has not responded to a request to comment further.

Savile was a major fundraiser for the hospital.

He began his charity work in 1972 after joining as a volunteer porter in 1969.

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