Missing killer Alan Giles' image displayed on touring police van

TV van displaying image of Alan Giles Alan Giles was reported to have been seen in Inkberrow on Thursday

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A van with a 10 metre (32ft) TV screen showing an image of a missing killer is touring villages in Warwickshire and Worcestershire, police have said.

Alan John Giles, 56, was serving two life sentences for murdering and kidnapping a 16-year-old boy in 1995.

He absconded from HMP Hewell, near Redditch, Worcestershire, on Monday.

West Mercia Police said the van showing his image will visit Alcester, Inkberrow, Studley and Wixsford.

Det Insp Leighton Harding said: "We believe the ad van may help us reach people who have not picked up our previous media appeals and hopefully one of these people will call in with the vital information that leads to Giles' return to prison."

Eagle tattoo

Specialist search teams, including dogs and the police helicopter, are being used in the search for Giles, police said.

The missing prisoner was reportedly seen in Inkberrow on Thursday night.

Police said other sightings have been reported across the South Warwickshire area.

Giles is about 5ft 9in with short, grey hair and blue eyes. He has a tattoo of an eagle on his back and tattoos of a flower, shark and swallow on his left arm.

Police said he should not be approached.

Giles was jailed at Birmingham Crown Court in 1997 for murdering Kevin Ricketts two years earlier.

The former labourer killed the teenager in an apparent revenge attack after the victim's sister ended a relationship with Giles.

Kevin is believed to have been abducted while going to classes at South Birmingham College in January 1995.

Giles would have been eligible for parole next year.

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