Osbornes Stationers goes into administration

Osbornes Stationers, Mealcheapen Street, Worcester Osbornes Stationers was established in 1832 and had 20 branches when it went into administration

A 200-year-old high street chain has gone into administration, putting 140 jobs at risk.

Staff at Osbornes Stationers, which is based in Birmingham and has 20 branches across the Midlands and South West, were told on Tuesday.

Restructuring firm FRP Advisory was appointed as administrator on Monday.

Directors at the stationers said the business had been suffering since the start of the economic downturn in 2008.

Steve Stokes, partner at FRP Advisory and joint administrator, said: "Despite the continuing support of a loyal customer base, anticipated cash flow problems have prompted the need for the directors to seek the protection of administration whilst the business is restructured and marketed for sale."

Osbornes was founded as a printing business in Birmingham city centre in 1832 by Edward Corn Osborne.

The company has seven stores in Birmingham, three in Warwickshire, three in Nottinghamshire, three in Leicestershire and single shops in Bristol, Tewkesbury, Worcester and Daventry.

More on This Story

The BBC is not responsible for the content of external Internet sites

More England stories

RSS

Features & Analysis

  • SyedTanks instead of toys

    Lyse Doucet on the plight of children in Syria and Gaza


  • Silhouette of manSuper-shy

    Why do Germany's super-rich so often keep their heads down?


  • Gin drinkerMother's ruin

    The time was gin was full of sulphuric acid and turpentine


  • The two sisters in their bakery'Must be mad'

    Why two Spanish sisters started a bakery in a desert


Elsewhere on the BBC

  • EscaladeBling's the thing

    The ostentatious Cadillac Escalade cruises into 2015 with fuel-gulping gusto

Programmes

  • The smartphones of shoppers being tracked in a storeClick Watch

    How free wi-fi can enable businesses to track our movements and learn more about us

BBC © 2014 The BBC is not responsible for the content of external sites. Read more.

This page is best viewed in an up-to-date web browser with style sheets (CSS) enabled. While you will be able to view the content of this page in your current browser, you will not be able to get the full visual experience. Please consider upgrading your browser software or enabling style sheets (CSS) if you are able to do so.