PCC attack on 'cloud cuckoo land' cannabis campaigners

 
PCC Matthew Grove PCC Matthew Grove is opposed to the legalisation of cannabis

Campaigners calling for the legalisation of cannabis are living in "cloud cuckoo land", according to Humberside's Police and Crime Commissioner (PCC).

Matthew Grove has rejected claims that police resources are being wasted targeting cannabis growers and dealers.

Some cannabis users believe they are being unfairly criminalised.

I met multiple sclerosis sufferer Sue Lunn, who admits to smoking cannabis on a regular basis at her home in Hull.

She says it eases the pain caused by her condition.

In April 2013, the former police special constable received a conditional discharge when she appeared in court charged with possession of cannabis.

Speaking to the Sunday Politics in Yorkshire and Lincolnshire, Sue Lunn said: "I think the law is very unjust.

"I don't feel like a criminal and most people who know me don't consider me a criminal."

War on drugs

The deputy prime minister Nick Clegg has reopened the debate by claiming that governments across the world are losing the war on drugs.

Campaigners point to the growing number of countries and US states - such as Colorado - which have either legalised or decriminalised the use of marijuana.

Some suggest there is evidence that ending drug prohibition would reduce crime.

But the Humberside PCC has ruled out a "softly, softly" approach to drugs.

Matthew Grove told me there would be no liberalisation of police tactics "on his watch" and claimed that cannabis was the source of widespread misery in many parts of his force area.

Mr Grove said: "To pretend that criminality will disappear because cannabis is legalised, whoever is suggesting that is living on cloud cuckoo land."

In 2004, the Labour government allowed cannabis to be downgraded to a less harmful class C drug.

It was a move which was designed to free-up police resources to deal with more serious drugs such as heroin and cocaine.

However, cannabis was reclassified as a class B drug in 2009 due to fears about the impact stronger varieties were having on mental health.

 
Tim Iredale Article written by Tim Iredale Tim Iredale Political editor, Yorkshire & Lincolnshire

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  • rate this
    0

    Comment number 23.

    So its OK for the Gov to collect taxes on alcohol and tobacco which are 2 major burdens on the medical profession ..but criminalise Hashish??? The lunatics truly are out an about an have indeed taken over the asylum.

  • rate this
    0

    Comment number 22.

    "However, cannabis was reclassified as a class B drug in 2009 due to fears about the impact stronger varieties were having on mental health."

    Maybe you should add in a line about how cannabis was reclassified completely against scientific evidence and advice. The Government were (and are) so opposed to evidence-based policy that they sacked David Nutt over it.

  • rate this
    +1

    Comment number 21.

    Matthew Grove is more worried about his budget.
    When cannabis was declassified, the police arrest records went down so much, it looked like they were doing nothing.
    Without the easy targets of puffers, the area budget was reduced, meaning less funds for the top brass to squander.

  • rate this
    +1

    Comment number 20.

    Matthew Grove is living in his own cloud cuckoo land.
    Alcohol is the worse drug on the market, but as the gov't take their cut of the profits its ok.
    Man made drugs should be available only on proscription,
    What nature provides should be free for all.

  • rate this
    +1

    Comment number 19.

    I have a feeling Mr Groves "watch" will be over pretty soon. Elected on a turn-out of 19.5% of the electorate and only 22% of the vote in the first round Mr Grove was elected on the say so of a mere 10% of all eligible voters, 5% in the first round. He would have lost if it was first past the post! Toke 'n' vote him out people.

 

Comments 5 of 23

 

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