England

Battle of Hastings 950th year sees red-tipped arrow hunt

Arrow on the battlefield Image copyright English Heritage
Image caption The first arrow was placed on the battlefield in Sussex

Red-tipped arrows have been hidden at tourist attractions across England to mark the 950th anniversary of the Battle of Hastings.

English Heritage has hidden 1,066 arrows at castles, forts, stone circles and stately homes.

Finders win one of 1,066 prizes - one is a sleepover at Dover Castle.

The search started with an arrow placed on the battlefield in Sussex on "the very site where William beat Harold", chief executive Kate Mavor said.

The hunt continues until all the arrows, which also have red feathers and a unique code, have been found.

Image copyright English Heritage
Image caption Out of the 1,066 prizes, one is a sleepover at Dover Castle
Image copyright English Heritage
Image caption The arrows could be at stone circles, stately homes and forts such as this one on Hadrian's Wall

Ms Mavor said: "1066 is the most famous date in English history and the Battle of Hastings was arguably the most important battle in our history, the results of which had consequences for every corner of England."

Other prizes include a private tour of Stonehenge and tickets to English Heritage's re-enactment of the Battle of Hastings in October.

Image copyright English Heritage
Image caption Smaller prizes include free entry to sites such as Waverley Abbey in Farnham and cream teas
Image copyright English Heritage
Image caption One of the prizes is a private tour of Stonehenge

The battle, which happened on 14 October 1066, is being marked with a series of events including recreating the march of King Harold's army from Yorkshire down to Battle, near Hastings, and his clash with the Normans.

The conflict saw the deaths of the country's last Anglo Saxon king, Harold Godwinson, and much of England's nobility and enabled William, Duke of Normandy, to claim the English throne.

This year, English Heritage will also open up the roof of the Great Gatehouse at the abbey founded at Battle by William of Normandy, who went on to be known as William the Conqueror.

Image copyright English Heritage
Image caption The hunt started with a giant arrow but the rest are harder to spot and could be at any of the charity's sites

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