Beds, Herts & Bucks

Faith healer 'died under torture'

Alfusaine Jabbi, 22, from Gambia in Africa
Image caption Alfusaine Jabbi was found dead in a Luton park

A faith healer found dead in Bedfordshire had been stabbed and beaten and salt rubbed in his wounds, a jury has heard.

The body of Alfusaine Jabbi, 22, was found in Luton's Leagrave park in 2006.

Rubina Maroof, 30, who lived in Pembroke Avenue, Luton, at the time of Mr Jabbi's death, denies murder and conspiracy to imprison Mr Jabbi.

Prosecutors have told Luton Crown Court he was tortured to make him repay money he had charged Ms Maroof.

Pathologist Nicholas Hunt said Mr Jabbi died from a loss of blood and internal bleeding caused by a combination of beatings and a stab wound.

"He had lost about half the blood circulating in the body, it was a very significant blood loss."

'Severe pain'

The court heard bruising to the back of his thighs would have required the kind of force similar to a road crash or a fall from a considerable height.

There was also bruising to his shins and other parts of his body, and evidence that his wrists had been bound.

Dr Hunt said salt was also found at the injury sites.

"The blows to the front of the shins were delivered deliberately to cause severe pain and the stab wound was to a very sensitive area of the body.

"I would expect the assault to have been very painful," he said.

He told the court he could not give an exact time on how long it would have taken Mr Jabbi to die, but he "would not expect it to be rapid".

The jury has heard from prosecutor Frances Oldham QC, who said Mr Jabbi was able to persuade vulnerable clients to part with large sums of money in return for his services.

She said these included promising to sacrifice camels in the Gambia and rituals involving wrapping sums of cash in clean underwear.

"We say that Rubina Maroof had given him a lot of money as a client and that money was needed back," he said.

The trial continues.

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