Marlon O'Reilly named as Dove Cote pub shooting victim

The scene Police were still at the scene on Saturday

The man gunned down in a busy Birmingham pub was a 33-year-old father who had been drinking with friends, police have said.

Marlon O'Reilly was shot at the Dove Cote pub in Cockshut Hill, Sheldon, at about 17:45 BST on Friday.

Police believe it was a "targeted attack", but said the motive "remains unclear".

West Midlands Police said several shots were fired and Mr O'Reilly was pronounced dead at the scene.

A large area around the pub was cordoned off and floral tributes were laid at the scene on Saturday.

Insp Derek Packham said: "Marlon was enjoying a Friday evening drink with his friends when he was shot."

'Returning from work'

"We continue to establish the events that led to his death and we are keen to hear from anyone who may have seen Mr O'Reilly.

The scene Roads around the pub were reopened after police searches were complete

"We are currently investigating a number of lines of inquiry and have conducted house to house, forensic searches of the scene and continue to trawl CCTV for clues, but we still need people to come forward.

"Family liaison officers continue to offer support to the family at this sad time."

There have been no arrests.

"It was relatively sunny," Mr Packham said.

"People were returning home from work, perhaps people visiting the pub, people leaving the pub, people in the houses - it's a residential area - there were a few people about."

The victim is yet to be formally identified.

Roads around the pub reopened on Saturday afternoon.

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