Clifton Suspension Bridge: Traffic-calming measures proposed

Clifton Suspension Bridge Detailed plans of the proposals will be shown at two public exhibitions

Related Stories

Plans to make the area around Clifton Suspension Bridge in Bristol more pedestrian and environmentally-friendly have been put forward.

Traffic-calming measures for the approach roads are proposed to maintain the traffic flow.

A coach drop-off bay would be built on nearby Observatory Road, with speed tables to help people cross the road.

The junction of Sion Hill and Suspension Bridge Road is also proposed to be modified to improve access.

Land needed from the Downs green space for the coach bay would be recovered by building-out a nearby junction.

Detailed plans of the proposals will be shown at two public exhibitions where design engineers can be questioned.

'Foot down'

They are due to take place on 13 July on Bridge Road and 3 August at Clifton library.

Bridge Master David Anderson said one of the main problems was speeding motorists.

"Once they've crossed the bridge it tends to be foot down... the speed of those vehicles accelerating away tends to be a big problem, particularly for pedestrians.

"[Engineers] have come up with a scheme for both approach roads which will slow that traffic down to a more appropriate speed.

"[Motorists] won't be held up, these measures aren't designed to reduce the capacity for traffic at all - any queues or delays won't be any longer - it will just allow people to drive a little slower," he added.

More on This Story

Related Stories

The BBC is not responsible for the content of external Internet sites

BBC Bristol

Weather

Bristol

10 °C 1 °C

Features & Analysis

Elsewhere on the BBC

  • GeoguessrWhere in the world?

    Think you’re a geography expert? Test your knowledge with BBC Travel’s Geoguessr

Programmes

  • Suspension bridge connecting mountain peaksThe Travel Show Watch

    Must-see global events including walking the first suspension bridge to connect mountain peaks

BBC © 2014 The BBC is not responsible for the content of external sites. Read more.

This page is best viewed in an up-to-date web browser with style sheets (CSS) enabled. While you will be able to view the content of this page in your current browser, you will not be able to get the full visual experience. Please consider upgrading your browser software or enabling style sheets (CSS) if you are able to do so.