Bristol

Bristol care home 'voice of God' killer Ryan Guest detained

Una Dorney Image copyright From Avon and Somerset Police
Image caption Una Dorney, 87, was found dead at Oaktree House, Yate, in June

A man with paranoid schizophrenia has been detained indefinitely for killing his step-grandmother at her care home.

Ryan Guest, 38, pleaded guilty to the manslaughter of Una Dorney, 87, who was found dead at Oaktree House in Yate, near Bristol.

He told police he smothered her with a pillow after hearing voices from God telling him to do it, Bristol Crown Court heard.

He also admitted trying to kill a prisoner in jail while on remand.

'Appalling violence'

On detaining him, the judge Mr Justice Dingemans said the restriction was necessary to protect the public from serious harm, telling Guest the offences "have shown appalling violence that you can inflict when suffering delusional beliefs".

Image copyright Avon and Somerset Police
Image caption Guest has been detained to Broadmoor Hospital where he will remain indefinitely

He added: "As has been acknowledged on your behalf, this might mean that you are never released and it will ensure that you are not released when you remain a danger to the public."

The court had been told how Guest, of Birkdale in Yate, went to visit Mrs Dorney on 18 June and was later seen by care home staff fleeing her room.

Staff found her lying on the floor of her bathroom, and Guest was arrested hours later by police at his nearby home.

He told police he had repeatedly smothered the widow after hearing voices in his head telling him to kill her, and fearing she had "taken his soul".

Guest also pleaded guilty to the attempted murder of Mohamed Sharif, 38, who was attacked while on remand in prison at HMP Bristol.

He was left in a vegetative state after suffering severe head injuries on 26 June.

The court was told Guest attacked Mr Sharif because he thought he was the Prophet Muhammad and had put a curse on him.

Guest will remain at Broadmoor Hospital where he was diagnosed with paranoid schizophrenia.

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