Bristol

Ill woman's deportation from UK 'like committing manslaughter'

Desree Taylor and her mother Irene Nel
Image caption Mrs Nel (right) was taken ill during a trip to see her daughter - Desree Taylor - in 2012

Deporting a woman with kidney failure from the UK back to South Africa would be like "committing manslaughter", an immigration advisor says.

Irene Nel, 73, was diagnosed during a family visit to Bristol - travelling on a six-month tourist visa - in 2012.

The Home Office has said she cannot stay and it "carefully considers all cases on their individual merits".

But James Davies, of the International Care Network, believes being put on a flight could prove fatal for Mrs Nel.

"My understanding is that doctors have said she cannot fly therefore she cannot be removed," he said.

"It would seem much more sensible to give her leave to remain, so that she's able to stay."

Image caption The family have launched a petition and put up posters around Bristol in a bid to raise awareness and public support

It would be "impossible to remove her without in effect committing manslaughter - because that's the likely outcome were she to be put on a plane", Mr Davies added.

Mr Davies is not working on behalf of the family, but has been in contact to offer advice after his involvement in a similar case involving Myrtle Cothill, 92, who is also South African and was given permission to remain in Dorset due to "compassionate and exceptional circumstances".

Last month, Mrs Nel's family wrote to the home secretary appealing for clemency over her deportation, but they have not yet had a reply.

A Home Office spokesman said: "All cases are carefully considered on their individual merits, in line with the UK immigration rules."

Mrs Nel is being cared for by her daughter Desree Taylor, who said she needs to have dialysis "to keep her alive".

The family employed a lawyer earlier in their battle for her to remain, but they are currently without legal representation.

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