Bristol

Virus glass sculpture exhibition opens in Bristol

Luke Jerram and his foot and mouth virus sculpture Image copyright Ben Birchall
Image caption Bristol-based artist Luke Jerram worked with University of Bristol virologists to ensure each model was accurate

Glass sculptures depicting the world's most deadly viruses have gone on display.

Artist Luke Jerram worked with University of Bristol virologists to ensure the models - which include HIV, swine flu and smallpox - were accurate.

He said his Glass Microbiology exhibition was designed to "contemplate the global impact of each disease".

The exhibition will be on at the At-Bristol science museum until 4 September.

The sculptures, which are not restricted solely to depictions of viruses, were made in collaboration with glassblowers Brian Jones and Norman Veitch.

Mr Jerram's previous art projects include turning Park Street in Bristol into a giant water slide, and mooring a flotilla of abandoned fishing boats in Leigh Woods.

Image copyright Ben Birchall
Image caption Tamsin Huggins, 22, from Bristol, looks at a malaria-inspired glass sculpture
Image copyright Ben Birchall
Image caption A sculpture of the Zika virus
Image copyright Ben Birchall
Image caption The HIV virus is also represented among the sculptures
Image copyright Ben Birchall
Image caption A glass sculpture of the EV71 hand-foot-and-mouth disease (HFMD) - the virus can cause a fever and unsightly lesions but is not deadly

Related Topics

More on this story

Related Internet links

The BBC is not responsible for the content of external Internet sites