Cambridgeshire

Pupil's game helps with English grammar teaching

Crawford Johnston with Creative Writing Magic Money Cards
Image caption Crawford Johnston with the grammar cards he designed at primary school

A pupil from Peterborough has created a game that is being used in English lessons at schools across the city.

Crawford Johnston initially designed the Creative Writing Magic Money Cards to help him understand English grammar.

The cards explain concepts such as the use of paragraphs and terms such as onomatopoeia.

"Money" points are allocated to each card and pupils are encouraged to use as many as possible to increase their winnings.

The onomatopoeia card explains it is related to "words that make the sound".

It cites examples including "the sausages sizzled in the frying pan" and lists other onomatopoeic words including slosh, thud and squish.

'Fun and competitive'

Crawford was still at primary school when he came up with the idea for the grammar cards.

Image caption One of the creative writing grammar cards designed to help children with their English lessons

"I thought it was an idea that was just going to work for me, to help me revise for exams," he explained.

"I didn't want to make it boring because then people would switch off.

"I wanted to make it fun - like a game - making it competitive so that children want to do it, rather than thinking that it's just another lesson."

The cards are intended for pupils aged nine to 15 and are tailored to fit in with Key Stages two and three of the National Curriculum.

Jonathan Lewis, assistant director of education and services at Peterborough City Council, confirmed that he had arranged for the cards to be distributed to all primary schools in the city.

The Johnston family hopes the success of the game will lead to it being used in more schools around the country.

Crawford, who is now 13, said he was excited by the prospect that his game might be used at other schools.

"If it's going to be used around the UK, it's fascinating. It's really something," he said.

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