Cambridgeshire

Prison lovers lose legal fight

HMP Whitemoor Image copyright PA
Image caption HMP Whitemoor is a maximum security prison for 460 inmates in the Cambridgeshire fens near March

Two jailed paedophiles who were separated from their inmate lovers have lost a legal battle to be allowed to be with them in prison.

David Bright and Andrew Keeley were contesting decisions to move their partners from their respective jails at HMP Whitemoor in Cambridgeshire and HMP Maidstone in Kent.

Bright and Keeley's legal team said their human rights were being breached.

The Court of Appeal has ruled they cannot have a judicial review.

Bright was convicted in 2003 for sexual assault and gross indecency on a child and given a life sentence.

Image caption Maidstone Prison houses about 600 inmates in Category C accommodation

He had formed a relationship with Beau Beale, another inmate at Whitemoor, but Beale was moved to HMP Wakefield after an alleged rape and assault on him by another prisoner.

'Cell sex'

The court heard Bright and Beale intended to become civil partners.

Keeley, who was given an eight-year sentence for indecent assault on a boy in 2010, had met rapist John Doughty in Maidstone where they were separated for "inappropriate conduct" after being seen having sex in a cell in 2012, the court heard.

They entered a civil partnership in 2012, but Doughty was moved to HMP Bure, Norfolk in May 2013.

Bright and Keeley were seeking judicial reviews of the prison decisions, claiming they had a right to a private and family life and that prison policies on same-sex relationships were unclear.

Lord Dyson, Master of the Rolls, said the prison authorities acted in accordance with the law and he upheld an earlier High Court decision not to allow a judicial review.

In his judgement, he said it was "not always possible to differentiate between consensual and coercive relationships in a custodial situation".

Lord Dyson said Beale was moved due to perceived threats against him and it was "nothing to do with his sexual relationship".

He ruled that Doughty had been moved because he and Keeley were "unwilling to behave with the common decency with which offenders, staff and visitors are expected to conduct themselves".

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