Cornwall

Cornish language funding stopped by government

The Cornish flag and Tamar Bridge Image copyright (C) British Broadcasting Corporation
Image caption Cornwall Council said it had received up to £150,000 a year to support the Cornish language since it was recognised in 2003

Cornish language funding has been stopped with immediate effect by central government, angering council and tourism bosses.

Cornwall Council said it had received up to £150,000 a year since Cornish was recognised as a minority language in 2003.

The authority said it received confirmation of the cut in a letter.

The government has claimed it is "committed to Cornwall" as shown by the county's "historic devolution deal".

Julian German, council cabinet member for culture, said: "The prime minister makes a point of telling us how much he loves Cornwall and the devolution deal highlights the government's recognition of our unique culture and heritage.

"However, when it comes to backing those statements up, the government just doesn't deliver for Cornwall."

Image copyright Visit Cornwall
Image caption The council is yet to confirm whether any jobs will be lost as a result of the funding cut

The authority said government funding, which had been used to "support the development of the language", had been provided since it was recognised under the Charter for Regional and Minority Languages in 2003.

Malcolm Bell, head of Visit Cornwall, said: "The Cornish language is an essential part of the Cornwall brand."

The council is yet to confirm whether any jobs will be lost as a result of the funding cut.

A Department of Communities and Local Government spokesman said: "This government is committed to Cornwall as shown by our historic devolution deal - the first county deal in the country.

"On top of this, Cornwall will have a core spending power of £1.7bn over the next four years.

"It is for local councils to decide what their priorities are and fund the services local people want to see."

In 2014, Cornish people were granted minority status under European rules for the protection of national minorities.

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