Coventry & Warwickshire

Warwick health staff plea after heavy snow

Warwick Hospital has appealed to any off-duty health care staff who live locally to help after heavy snow fell across Coventry and Warwickshire.

Hospital officials said the snow had made many of the county's roads impassable to many staff trying to get to the hospital.

They urged any trained nurses or health care assistants in the area to help on Saturday night or Sunday morning.

The Met Office issued a severe weather warning across the West Midlands.

The heaviest snowfalls have been seen in south Warwickshire, including in Warwick and Stratford-upon-Avon.

Any health care staff who are available to help have been urged to contact the hospital directly.

Drivers have been warned to only travel if it is "absolutely essential" after snowfall in Coventry and across Warwickshire.

Insp Darren Webster, from Warwickshire Police, said journeys would take much longer and there were a "lot more risks" when driving in snow.

The force said widespread icy roads and snow were expected in many areas over the weekend.

Birmingham Airport was among UK airports where some flights were cancelled or delayed because of conditions.

4x4 appeal

Meanwhile, West Midlands Ambulance Service said Friday was its busiest day since regional records began.

It responded to 3,941 calls throughout the region, which was about 120 more responses than overnight on last New Year's Eve, which is traditionally the busiest time for the service.

A service spokeswoman said: "A large number of these calls were to reports of breathing problems, road traffic collisions and slips trips and falls, which have come about due to the sudden on set of cold weather."

The service has also appealed for help from 4x4 drivers to help cope with increased demand during the adverse weather.

It appealed to hear from 4x4 drivers in Coventry, Warwick, Rugby and Nuneaton, who were prepared to drive nurses to patients who required vital treatment in their homes.

This includes patients such as those who were diabetic or required kidney dialysis treatment, the service says.

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