Warwickshire man nose-pushes Brussels sprout up Snowdon

Stuart Kettell pushing a sprout up a hill Stuart Kettell completed his challenge at about 13:30 BST on Saturday

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A man has completed his challenge to push a Brussels sprout up Snowdon using his nose.

Stuart Kettell, from Balsall Common in the West Midlands, started out on Wednesday and reached the 1,085m (3,560ft) summit in three days.

The 49-year-old trained for his charity mission by pushing a sprout around his garden with his nose.

Mr Kettell said he selected a large sprout so it would not fall down a crevice in the rock.

His aim was to collect at least £5,000 in sponsorship for Macmillan Cancer Support, but does not yet know how much he has raised.

"People definitely think I'm mad, and I'm beginning to think it myself," he said.

Mr Kettell, who has previously raised money by staying inside a box for a week, said this latest challenge was the most uncomfortable yet.

"It hurt my arms, my legs, my feet, my knees and my neck," he said.

Stuart Kettell with a guard on his face Stuart Kettell wore a special faceguard to protect as much of his skin as possible

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