Cumbria

Repairs made to 'seagull-damaged' Carlisle Station roof

Carlisle Station roof Image copyright Network Rail
Image caption Toughened plastic has replaced glass panels in the roof

A £14.5m project to revamp the roof of Carlisle's historic railway station, which has in-part been damaged by seagulls, is nearing completion.

Work to replace glass panels on the roof, which dates back to 1847, began in November 2015.

Network Rail, which is doing the work, said some of the panels had been broken by seagulls continually dropping stones on them.

The glass has now been replaced with toughened plastic sheets.

In the past, platforms had to be closed because of the risks to passengers and staff from falling glass.

The roof's metalwork is also being brought back to life with a complete repaint and the main lighting above the platforms renewed.

Image caption An intricate network of scaffolding has had to be used to repair the roof

A completion date of February 2018 has been estimated, mainly because scaffolding which spans the West Coast Main Line can only be accessed for a short time on Saturday evenings to prevent delays.

Chris Atkins, project manager at Network Rail, said: "The rejuvenated roof will mean a brighter, more airy and cleaner environment which will enhance the station's beautiful features.

"It is a significant investment into Carlisle which has not been without its challenges. The scaffolding needed to carry out the work is a feat of engineering in itself but being able to carry out the work without impacting passengers' journeys was always our aim.

"The result will be a better station which will be a fitting gateway to the historic city of Carlisle."

Michael Byrne, of Virgin Trains, which manages the Grade II-listed station, added: "Once complete, it will transform this beautiful station, bringing it back to its former glory and enhance the experience for customers

Network Rail has worked closely with Historic England and Carlisle City Council on the scheme.

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