Derby

Reunion after baby umbilical cord drama in Derbyshire

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Media captionElla Barber was born at home with the umbilical cord around her neck

A baby who nearly died when the umbilical cord became caught around her neck during birth has been reunited with the paramedics who saved her life.

Ella Barber was born when her mother Michelle went into labour at their Derbyshire home on 15 August 2016.

Ms Barber's sister Jo Lambert called 999 when they realised there was a problem with the cord and Ella was struggling to breathe.

Paramedic Amanda Bird said it was "brilliant" she was now fully fit.

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Image caption Amanda Bird arrived at the home within three minutes of the emergency call

Michelle Barber, from Sandiacre, suddenly went into labour at home, but there was not enough time to get her to hospital.

Her sister realised the cord was wrapped around Ella's neck while talking to the emergency call handler.

"I was really scared." she said. "Michelle was screaming 'she's going to die, she's going to die.'

"I just thought I need to get her breathing and I did my best."

Joanne Shepherd took the emergency call and told Ms Lambert calmly to slide her finger under the cord and carefully pull it over the baby's head.

She said: "It was only my second baby delivery coming out of training so one I won't forget... not an easy one, but a really nice outcome."

Image copyright Michelle Barber
Image caption Michelle Barber and baby Ella not long after her dramatic birth

Ms Bird arrived at the house within three minutes of the call.

She said: "She wasn't breathing, she was blue and she needed stimulation to breathe otherwise she wouldn't be here today celebrating her first birthday.

"I was thinking 'come on you little monkey, you are going to breathe' and she did, which was wonderful."

She added that it was "absolutely brilliant" that Ella was fully fit a year on.

Mum Michelle said of the reunion: "It's amazing and lovely to catch up again... people don't normally get to see [medical staff] afterwards."

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