Devon and Cornwall crime figures show 11% reduction

Crime figures released by the Home Office for Devon and Cornwall show an 11% reduction in recorded crime.

Violence against the person, robbery and burglary have fallen; as have theft, criminal damage and vehicle crime.

But sexual offences have shown a rise of 15%, according to the Home Office.

Police said this was linked to the influence of drink-related sex offences and domestic and child abuse cases. Recorded drugs offences rose by 5%.

Deputy Chief Constable Shaun Sawyer, of Devon and Cornwall Police, said they were aware that all crime had a "profound impact on people's lives, particularly those involving violence".

But a fall of 9% across the south west as a whole meant the force was "outperforming the national average".

Police said the increase in sexual offences was a concern, but there was "an increased awareness and confidence in reporting" such offences.

The report also contains figures for the public's perception of crime and anti-social behaviour in Devon, Cornwall and the Isles of Scilly.

This showed that 8% of the public believed there was a high level of anti-social behaviour in Devon and Cornwall, compared to a figure of 14% nationwide.

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