Devon

Totnes one-way street campaign wins court fight

Totnes Image copyright Google
Image caption Devon County Council changed the traffic flow through Totnes in 2013 which meant vehicles could no longer be driven up the High Street from the bottom of the town

Campaigners including BBC presenter Jonathan Dimbleby and comic writer Peter Richardson have won a legal battle over a one-way street.

Last year the High Court ruled Devon County Council unlawfully changed the direction of traffic in Totnes, after traders claimed business was suffering.

The council appealed, saying it made the area safer.

But the Court of Appeal has upheld the decision, leaving the authority facing a six-figure legal bill.

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'We're going to have a big party'

Campaigner Peter Richardson, the writer, director and actor known for the Comic Strip Presents, said: "We're going to have a big party.

"Totnes will be a proper market town again."

Mr Dimbleby was among campaigners who marched in 2014, describing the traders as "the life blood of this community"

£100,000 legal costs

Devon County Council changed the traffic flow through Totnes in 2013 which meant vehicles could no longer be driven up the High Street from the bottom of the town.

The Court of Appeal decision means that the traffic flow will be returned from 3 May.

The legal costs already stand at more than £100,000, against a backdrop of the council having to save £110m over the next four years.

Image copyright Devon County Council
Image caption The county council changed the layout of roads in Totnes

A Devon County Council spokesman said: "The County Council is obviously disappointed with the outcome of the appeal.

"We will comply with the ruling and remove the current signing so that traffic will be able to travel up the high street.

"We anticipate that the volume of traffic will increase in Fore Street, and would like to advise pedestrians to take extra care to avoid injury or accident."

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