Dorset

Knob-throwing contest moves to Kingston Maurward

Knob Throwing
Image caption The Knob Throwing festival moved to the grounds of Kingston Maurward House in 2017 after outgrowing its former venue

Dorset's annual knob-throwing festival has taken place at a new venue.

The event moved to Kinsgton Maurward House near Dorchester, having outgrown the village of Cattistock where it has been held since its inception in 2008.

Despite the rainy conditions, more than 4,000 people attended with participants hurling the locally-made buns in pursuit of a new record.

Organiser Katharine Wright described it as "quirky and unique".

Image caption During the throwing competition, the savoury biscuits must be thrown underarm and one of the competitor's feet must remain on the ground.

It was set up to raise money for village causes and now incorporates a food festival.

More than 4,000 of the buns were brought in for the throwing, along with other games including knob archery, knob and spoon racing and pin the knob on the Cerne giant.

During the throwing competition, the savoury biscuits must be thrown underarm and one of the competitor's feet must remain on the ground.

Pete Asher threw his bun the furthest in the rainy conditions at 22.70m (74.4ft)

Samuel Chinchen won the children's event, with a throw of 16.04m (52.6ft); while Catrin Vaughn topped the women's contest with a 18.65m (61.2ft) throw.

The record remains held by Dave Phillips with an astounding 29.4m (96ft) throw in 2012.

Ms Wright said: "People come from far and wide. It's grown every year - this is our 10th year so no better time to move to a bigger venue."


Dorset knob facts

  • The biscuit-textured buns have been made by Moores of Morecombelake for more than 150 years
  • Originally they were made from leftover bread dough with added butter and sugar, hand-rolled into buns and left to dry in the dying heat of the oven
  • It is thought their name comes from the hand-sewn Dorset knob buttons that were also made locally
  • They can be eaten with Blue Vinny cheese, dipped in tea or cider, or taken with honey and cream - known locally as thunder and lightning

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