Essex

Danbury fatal ambulance crash driver accused in 'wrong lane'

Faye Parson,
Image caption Faye Parson, 41, denies causing the death by careless driving

An ambulance driver on an emergency call whose vehicle hit and killed a man on a pedestrian crossing was in the wrong lane, a court heard.

Faye Parson, 41, also cannot remember if her siren was on at the time of the crash in Danbury, Essex, when she hit Michael Daly, 77, who later died.

Ms Parson denies causing death by careless driving, on 4 February 2016.

Chelmsford Crown Court heard the ambulance's blue lights were on, but there was no record the siren was on.

According to the ambulance's data recorder, at the time Ms Parson was driving at 29mph (46.5km/h) in an area where the limit is 30mph (48km/h).

The defendant, of Church Street, Braintree, Essex, pulled into the wrong lane to overtake a queue of traffic as she approached the crossing, the jury heard.

Image copyright SWNS
Image caption Michael Daly was crossing the A414 Main Road on his way home from his dental surgery when he was hit

Peter Clement, prosecuting, said the traffic lights were on red as Mr Daly crossed the A414 Main Road on his way home from his dental surgery.

The passenger-side wing mirror of the ambulance hit Mr Daly and he was flung into the path of a van in queuing traffic, the court heard.

He suffered severe brain injuries and was taken to St George's Hospital in Tooting, London by air ambulance.

Image caption Peter Clement, prosecuting, said the traffic lights were on red as Mr Daly crossed the A414 Main Road on his way home from his dental surgery

Mr Clement said: "[Ms Parson] could not recall if she had her sirens on as she approached that crossing but she said at interview probably not as the road was clear and she did not foresee any problems.

"No-one for a moment is suggesting Miss Parson set out on that journey intending to drive poorly or with a disregard for other users' road safety."

He said the issue was whether her driving met the standards expected of a competent and careful driver.

The court heard Mr Daly's life support machine was switched off four months later, after he contracted the MRSA superbug and suffered a cardiac arrest.

The trial continues.