Gloucestershire

Roman flood bank found under demolished Gloucester bus station

Remains of Roman flood bank Image copyright Gloucester City Council
Image caption Experts say the area would have suffered from flooding around the 3rd to 4th century AD

A flood bank built by the Romans has been discovered under a recently demolished bus station in Gloucester.

Experts say the area would have suffered from flooding around the 3rd to 4th century AD so banks would have been created to protect the city.

Cotswold Archaeology carried out the dig prior to building work starting on the city's new transport hub.

Archaeologist Andrew Armstrong said it "was clear" that flooding has always been an issue in Gloucester.

The findings revealed that residents of the Roman city of Glevum used discarded bricks and stones from demolished buildings to reinforce the southern bank along the River Twyver, which was likely to be used as a flood defence.

Boggy ground

No buildings or settlement were found during the investigation, so it is believed the ground would have been too boggy and not suitable for construction.

This suggests the White Friars Carmelite monastery did not extend as far as the bus station, and was entirely around the junction of Station Road and Market Parade, Mr Armstrong said.

The team dug three 10ft (3.2m) trenches to find out if any important archaeological remains survived beneath the city.

Gloucester City Council's Paul James said: "The history of our city always amazes me.

"It's fascinating that all those years ago Gloucester flooded and people who lived here used bricks and stones from once standing buildings to protect their town."

Image copyright Gloucester City Council
Image caption Archaeologists dug 10 feet (3.2m) below ground level to find out if any important archaeological remains survived beneath the city
Image copyright Gloucester City Council
Image caption Residents of the Roman city of Glevum used discarded stones from demolished buildings to reinforce the bank along the River Twyver

Related Topics

More on this story

Related Internet links

The BBC is not responsible for the content of external Internet sites