Hampshire & Isle of Wight

Boomtown Rats re-united with Geldof for Isle of Wight Festival

Bob Geldof
Image caption Bob Geldof left The Boomtown Rats in 1986

Bob Geldof is to front a reunited Boomtown Rats at the Isle of Wight Festival - 26 years after last performing with the band.

The band have been added to the Sunday line-up of this year's event at Seaclose Park in Newport.

They are to play the main stage in a UK festival exclusive.

Geldof said: "I've always fancied playing the Isle of Wight Festival ever since I hitched there in the good/bad days when I was a kid."

'Classic catalogue'

The Boomtown Rats will join a line-up also featuring The Killers and Bon Jovi, who have already been announced as headliners for the first major festival of the summer, in June.

John Giddings, the festival's promoter, said: "It's great that they have chosen the Isle of Wight Festival as their reunion. Our audience will love them, their catalogue is classic."

After forming in 1975 The Boomtown Rats played early UK shows with The Ramones and Talking Heads.

They were one of the biggest bands of the late 70s and 80s with a string of top 10 singles and albums and won Brit Awards, Ivor Novellos and Grammy Awards.

They made history as the first Irish band to have a UK number one hit with Rat Trap and followed that up with another number one with I Don't Like Mondays, which was a hit around the world.

They recorded six albums, three of which made the UK top 10, before splitting up in 1986.

The band's last major live performance was at the 1985 Live Aid concert at Wembley, organised by Geldof.

The group have been playing live in recent years without their famous frontman.

The Boomtown Rats are joined on the festival's line-up by their contemporaries Blondie, along with more up-and-coming acts like Jake Bugg and Emeli Sande.

The festival runs from 13-16 June, at Seaclose Park in Newport.

Last year's event was marred by heavy rain, which turned many car parks into mud baths with some festival-goers forced to sleep in their cars as traffic became gridlocked.

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