Humberside

Art to go on show in city to mark Hull's links with Iceland

Life-sized sculpture sitting on a concrete bench Image copyright Steinunn Thórarinsdóttir
Image caption The figures will be installed around the university campus and form an art trail

Life-sized sculptures of androgynous figures marking the links between Hull and Iceland are set to go on show.

The 10 cast iron statues are part of the University of Hull's Cairns exhibition which opens on 28 April.

They have been produced by Icelandic artist Steinunn Thórarinsdóttir, who created the bronze Voyage figure that was stolen from the Pier in 2011.

A specially commissioned trumpet solo is to be performed at a festival honouring the relationship.

Image copyright Steinunn Thórarinsdóttir
Image caption The sculptures vary in height with some measuring 8ft (2.5m) high

The figures, which vary in height, form an art trail on the Cottingham Road campus and represent navigation markers known as Cairns, which are piles of stones used as landmarks to guide both ships to the harbour and people on land.

It comes more than 10 years after the 6ft high Voyage statue was installed on Nelson Street while its sister sculpture For was placed on the Icelandic coastline of Vik.

They were commissioned as a memorial to those who worked and died at sea and to celebrate the connection between both towns.

A replica of the 47.2 stone (300kg) Voyage figure had to be recast by Thórarinsdóttir and installed in 2012 after the original was stolen by scrap metal thieves.

Image copyright Steinunn Thórarinsdóttir
Image caption For, the sister statue to the Voyage sculpture, stands in the Icelandic town of Vik

Hull university lecturer and trumpeter Dr Simon Desbruslais will perform a new composition at the foot of the statue, as part of John Grant's North Atlantic Flux: Sounds from Smoky Bay festival, which starts on 28 April.

A university spokesperson said it was "believed to be the longest ever piece composed for a solo trumpet".

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