Leicester

Saxon and Norman coins sell for thousands

Coin found near Eye in Suffolk Image copyright Spink
Image caption The coin found near Eye in 2012 is from a king known to history only from his coins

Three rare silver pennies, two Saxon and one Norman, have sold for more than £11,000 at auction.

The earlier coins, both made by a moneyer, Wihtred, in Ipswich between 757 and 800 AD, were found separately by metal detectorists in Suffolk.

One found near Eye in 2012 sold for £5,500, while another, discovered near Haughley in June, went for £2,200.

The Norman penny, made in Leicester between 1066 and 1087 and showing William the Conqueror, sold for £3,500.

The coin found near Eye was made during the reign of the East Anglian King Eadwald and was expected to fetch up to £4,000.

Image copyright Spink
Image caption Most silver pennies were cut up to make smaller change, making the intact Norman coin very rare
Image copyright Spink
Image caption The coin found near Haughley is also believed to have been made by Wihtred

Dr Rory Naismith, author of The Coinage of Southern England 796-865, said the king was known "solely from his coins".

The second penny is thought to have been made during the reign of King Offa, between 757 and 796 AD.

The Norman coin, created in the city by a moneyer named Friothekest, met its highest estimated price.

Coins expert Jon Mann said the penny was of a "rare quality".

The coins were sold by specialist auctioneers Spink's in London.

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