Lincolnshire

Lincoln musician's goose bone flute appeal success

City of Lincoln Waites Image copyright City of Lincoln Waites
Image caption Al Garrod, pictured left, said his wife was unimpressed to find goose wings on the cooker

A 'medieval' musician who appealed for a goose bones to make a unique flute has said he has had a great response.

Al Garrod wanted to recreate the Norman flute in time to play at the 1 April reopening of Lincoln Castle, where its original fragments were found.

A £22m revamp of the castle includes a new vault to house the Magna Carta.

Mr Garrod said he was sent entire goose wings, which he had to boil down, as well as being offered help from professional bone carvers.

Mr Garrod, of the City of Lincoln Waites, said he decided to make a replica after he was contacted about the find.

Image caption Goose bone flutes were probably played by ordinary people, not professional musicians, Mr Garrod said

The bone he required was an ulna - the largest in the bird's wing.

The musician said he initially tried farmers and gamekeepers but began his appeal after being told it was the wrong time of year for goose bones.

He said he had quite a few responses and one man sent him three whole goose wings, which he had to "butcher, separate and boil for hours."

"It pleased my wife immensely to have goose wings boiling in the kitchen," he said.

Image copyright Arrol and Snell Architects
Image caption A large vault has been built at Lincoln Castle to hold the Magna Carta and the Forest Charter

Mr Garrod said he also had a good response from people able to make the flutes and was now eagerly awaiting their arrival in the post.

He said his original plan to play one as part of the Magna Carta celebrations depended on what it sounded like.

"Some people say they were never musical instruments and were a lure to entice an animal for hunters to kill."

"I might end up making the sound of a goose in distress," he said.

One of the flutes will go alongside the original fragments, which date back to about 1200, as part of an exhibition.

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