Lincolnshire

Emma Crossman case: Ex-partner 'was sent 100 texts a day'

Emma Crossman Image copyright Emma Crossman
Image caption Emma Crossman died in Sleaford, Lincolnshire, in January 2014

The ex-partner of a woman who took her own life has told a court he received 100 text messages a day from her.

Emma Crossman, 21, was found dead at her home in Sleaford, Lincolnshire, on 15 January 2014.

Adrian Kemp, 56, told Lincoln Crown Court the messages from Miss Crossman talked about ending her life but he did not think she would go through with it.

Amelia Caller, 22, of Great Hale, near Sleaford, denies assisting her friend to commit suicide.

Mr Kemp, a tattoo artist, said he had split up from Miss Crossman a month before she died but she still lived in the home they had shared.

'Cry for attention'

He said she self-harmed during the relationship and talked about suicide.

"I think it was more of a cry for attention than to physically, really try to do herself harm.

"I also saw it as a test to see if I would come to rescue her," he said.

Mr Kemp said the 21-year-old drank heavily when she was with Miss Caller and he had wanted to stop the two women from seeing each other.

"Milly knew how to push her buttons. She controlled her with the drink.

"When she hadn't been drinking she was the sweetest thing you could ever meet. When she was drinking she was a different person," he told the court.

Mr Kemp also told the court he had confiscated some gas bought for his ex-partner by Miss Caller.

Mark McKone, prosecuting, previously told the court there was no dispute that the defendant supplied a gas Miss Crossman used to kill herself.

He said Miss Caller was pleading not guilty on the basis she did not think her friend would take her own life.

The court has heard Miss Crossman had a history of depression, self-harm and tablet overdoses.

The trial continues.

Image caption Amelia Caller denies a charge of assisting suicide

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