Stockwell shop gun victim still has bullet in his head

From left: Nathaniel Grant, Kazeem Kolawole and Anthony McCalla
Image caption The three defendants deny causing grievous bodily harm with intent to Thusha and Mr Selvakumar

A man who was shot in the face at a London shop still has the bullet lodged in his head, the Old Bailey heard.

Roshan Selvakumar, 35, and five-year-old Thusha Kamaleswaran were injured when a gunman opened fire in Stockwell Food and Wine shop, jurors heard.

Mr Selvakumar said he felt a "blow" to the face and heard a "crunching sound", as the bullet went in, last March.

Kazeem Kolawole, 19, Anthony McCalla, 19, and Nathaniel Grant, 21, deny grievous bodily harm with intent.

Mr Grant, of Camberwell New Road, Camberwell; Mr Kolawole, of Black Prince Road, Lambeth; and Mr McCalla, of Oakdale Road, Streatham, also deny the attempted murder of Roshaun Bryan, who the prosecution says was the intended victim, and possession of a firearm with intent.

The jury heard that doctors felt it was too dangerous to remove the bullet lodged in Mr Selvakumar's head.

They were also told by a doctor who treated her that Thusha, who was left paralysed when she was shot in the chest, "died" twice before being saved by emergency surgery.

In a statement read in court Mr Selvakumar said he was standing by the door of the shop when he heard what sounded like gunfire and saw two men running into the shop, followed by a gunman on a bicycle.

He said: "They both ran through the open door into the back of the shop. I remember them lying down by the fridge.

"I became aware the male on the bike was now sitting on the frame and the bike was stopped in front of the shop, about a metre away.

"I remember lots of things happening very quickly. I remember bottles smashing on the floor by my feet.

"I was aware the man on the bike was firing the gun. I suddenly felt a blow to my face. I heard a crunching sound that sounded like teeth grinding.

Image caption Thusha suffered cardiac arrest and was clinically dead

"I thought I had been hit by a bottle. Blood was pouring everywhere."

Dr Malcolm Tunnicliffe, of King's College Hospital, south London, said Thusha was "clinically dead" for between one and two minutes when she was brought in.

In a statement read in court he said: "She had suffered a cardiac arrest. There was damage to vital blood vessels on the right side of her chest and there was pressure on her heart.

"The patient's heart was immediately restarted and she received two units of blood before going into theatre."

"Without this surgery, it is unlikely she would have survived."

The case continues.

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