Kate parents' cabbie: 'Jaw hit the floor'

Tracey Mitchell drove the Middletons to Kensington Palace

A London cab driver has described her shock at being asked to pick up the Duchess of Cambridge's parents from the hospital where the royal baby was born.

Tracey Mitchell, from the Isle of Dogs, east London, picked up Carole and Michael Middleton from St Mary's Hospital in west London on Tuesday.

She said when she was told who she would be picking up her "jaw nearly hit the floor".

She drove the Middletons to Kensington Palace.

"I had no idea I was picking them up," she said.

Once she had found out who she was picking up, she said waiting for them was "a mad-mad 10 to 15 minutes of my life".

'Bewildered by it'

"It is unbelievable," she added. "Not in a million years would I have ever thought I'd be picking up someone like that."

"If I knew, I would have done something with my hair, put my make-up on and made myself a bit more presentable," she said.

Tracey Mitchell Tracey Mitchell drove the cab that picked up Catherine's parents

"I was bewildered by it all."

She was asked if she overheard their conversation.

"I didn't really hear anything, which was a shame.

"Carole took a call and Michael looked quietly across the view of Hyde Park," she said.

"Once they got out at the end, I congratulated them on the arrival of their grandson. They said 'thank you very much'.

"They were lovely people. They seemed really nice and pleasant," she added.

She said the first thing she did afterwards was phone her husband to say "I can't believe what I've just been part of".

"My husband was laughing," she said. "He thought it was hysterical."

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